Cloud9 IDE Supports Client-Side API on Google Chrome

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2011-05-10 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

At the Google I/O developer conference, Cloud9 IDE announces support for new client-side file system API on Google's Chrome OS.

Cloud9 IDE has announced a private beta preview of its support for the proposed W3C client-side file system standard employed in recent versions of Google Chrome, and full integration with the Google App Engine.

Cloud9 IDE, which provides a cloud-based IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for Web and mobile apps, launched this new facility that provides Chrome OS support, making Cloud9 IDE a key method for creating applications on Google's CR-48 Chrome-based notebook, both on and off the cloud.

The new integrated solution enables developers to create their development project in Cloud9, and then test and run their code on the Google architecture. With the full support for the new file system (FS), Chrome app developers can cache their files in the local FS API and continue working when they go offline, and then automatically re-sync when they go back onto the Cloud9 IDE, to continue editing in the cloud, Cloud9 IDE officials said.

"Cloud9 IDE for Google App Engine lets developers build and run Web applications directly on Google's infrastructure, providing an economical one-stop cloud development and deployment platform," said Google App Engine evangelist, Fred Sauer, in a statement. "Instead of uploading an application, developers can now build, scale and maintain their applications right on Cloud9 IDE."

"Google Chrome is all about extending the cloud, so we are excited to announce the first cloud-based development environment for the Google Chrome OS and apps," said Ruben Daniels, CEO of Cloud9, in a statement. "Up to now, developers had no way to create apps when using a Google CR48 machine."

The Cloud9 private beta for Google Chrome and Google App Engine  will be shown in the Chrome Developer Sandbox at GoogleI/O, May 10-11, 2011 at San Francisco's Moscone Center. The beta will be generally available at the end of May, Cloud9 IDE officials said.


 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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