Application Development: Google's Go Programming Language: 30 Ways to Make It Better

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2012-04-02 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Google recently released version 1.0 of its Go programming language. Google initially introduced Go as an "experimental language in 2009 and has now come to a 1.0 release of the technology." At the time of its introduction, Google described Go as a language that attempts to combine the development speed found in a dynamic language like Python with the performance and safety of a compiled language like C or C++. In a March 28 blog post, Andrew Gerrand, a Google software engineer and core contributor to the Go language, wrote: "Today marks a major milestone in the development of the Go programming language. We're announcing Go version 1, or Go 1 for short, which defines a language and a set of core libraries to provide a stable foundation for creating reliable products, projects and publications." Go 1 is the first release of Go that is available in supported binary distributions, Gerrand said. "They are available for Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X and, we are thrilled to announce, Windows." In addition to the language itself, Google has spawned an ecosystem of projects that support and enhance the Go experience. Although more than 100 such projects exist, eWEEK highlights 30 that stand out and can impact the success of the Go language.
 
 
 

GG: A Build Tool for Go in Go Tool

GG is a builder for the Go language. It makes it easy to build your Go files into an executable file. It's released under the terms of the BSD License. GG is not as powerful as make utility. But it lets you build a simple file or a simple project. Projects can be described in the YAML language.
GG: A Build Tool for Go in Go Tool
 
 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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