IBM Jazzes Student Developers

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2008-03-17 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Big Blue announces grants to universities to use its Jazz platform.

SANTA CLARA, Calif.-IBM is offering its Jazz collaborative development environment to universities to teach the next generation of developers how to work in a global software development environment.

IBM made its announcement March 17 at the EclipseCon conference here.

Jazz is an IBM Rational project to build a scalable, extensible team collaboration platform for integrating work across the phases of the development life cycle.

"We're letting the students use the same tools in the classroom as they will use in the real world," said Robyn Gold, marketing manager for Jazz in IBM's Rational business unit.

Products built on the IBM Jazz technology platform allow a global team of developers with offices in multiple countries to collaborate. Every year IBM awards universities with grants allowing up-and-coming developers to research software development team collaboration on a global scale, said Li-Te Cheng, IBM research scientist for collaborative application development.

Some universities are using commercial products based on Jazz technology, such as IBM Rational Team Concert, in the classroom, Cheng said. IBM Rational Team Concert is a collaborative environment designed to improve team productivity by enabling real-time communication and collaboration across a software delivery team. Also, several universities are using Rational Team Concert in the classroom to provide students with a real-world experience of working in large distributed teams.

Cheng said the most recently awarded IBM research grants include grants to Brown University to use Jazz in the classroom. IBM also extended a grant to Carnegie Mellon University to build capabilities to support coordination among developers, based on communication and dependency data in the Jazz environment. Other educational institutions receiving grants are the University of Calgary and Saarland University in Germany, Cheng said.



 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date
Rocket Fuel