IronJS Brings JavaScript to .NET

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2010-01-26 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

With Microsoft touting its dynamic language support with technologies such as IronPython and IronRuby, a developer in Sweden named Fredrik Holmstrom is working toward the 0.1 release of a project known as IronJS, which will do for JavaScript what the aforementioned technologies did for Python and Ruby.

With Microsoft touting its dynamic language support with technologies such as IronPython and IronRuby, a developer in Sweden named Fredrik Holmstrom is working toward the 0.1 release of a project known as IronJS, which will do for JavaScript what the aforementioned technologies did for Python and Ruby.

IronJS is an implementation of JavaScript for the .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR), just as IronPython and IronRuby are implementations of Python and Ruby on the CLR.

In a Jan. 22 blog post about the performance of IronJS, Holmstrom wrote: "I've measured the performance compared to another JavaScript implementation available for the .NET CLR-Jint, which is not running on the DLR but is a custom interpreted runtime."

The DLR is Microsoft's Dynamic Language Runtime, and it consists of a set of services that run on top of the CLR and are used to implement dynamic languages on the .NET Framework.

Regarding overall performance of IronJS, Holmstrom said:

"All in all I'm happy with the performance of IronJS, considering that I have not spent a single second optimizing it and have made conscious decisions to not use several DLR optimization techniques to keep the code as simple as possible up until the 0.1 release."

Microsoft has hired expertise to help build up its dynamic language support. The company hired Jim Hugunin, a Python expert, to bring his IronPython project in-house, and Microsoft later hired Ruby expert John Lam to focus on the IronRuby work. Lam recently left the team to work on a new project at Microsoft.

For its part, Microsoft could conceivably be interested in an implementation of JavaScript on .NET. However, earlier plans to deliver Managed JScript on the DLR fizzled. JScript is Microsoft's flavor of ECMAScript, which is basically the formal name for JavaScript.

Meanwhile, in a separate post, Holmstrom said IronJS now compiles jQuery 1.4, the latest version of the popular JavaScript library. jQuery creator John Resig and the jQuery team released jQuery 1.4 on Jan. 14. 


 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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