Jtest Eases Development

 
 
By Peter Coffee  |  Posted 2005-05-09 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

It's easy to agree that the world needs more software testing, but it's much more difficult to turn that desire into a disciplined and cost-effective process.

Its easy to agree that the world needs more software testing, but its much more difficult to turn that desire into a disciplined and cost-effective process. The wrong kind of testing tool is like an automatic transmission in the hands of a driver with no good maps: It will merely make it easier to take the same long trip to nowhere interesting.

Avoiding that fate during enterprise Java development is clearly the mission of Jtest 6.0, released earlier this year by Parasoft. Major improvements over the previous release include a knowledge base of more than 500 predefined Java development rules, along with a portfolio of aids for tailoring the tool to represent and apply an organizations own development policies and priorities.

The 6.0 update also adds the automatic application of more than 100 security vulnerability rules and performs JavaServer Pages analysis.

Jtest generates and executes libraries of JUnit tests, improving a teams ability to build upon experience instead of approaching every piece of code as a brand-new exercise. Windows 2000, Windows XP, Solaris and Linux versions begin at $3,495 for single-machine licenses.

Go to www.parasoft.com for more information.

Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest news, reviews and analysis in programming environments and developer tools.
 
 
 
 
Peter Coffee is Director of Platform Research at salesforce.com, where he serves as a liaison with the developer community to define the opportunity and clarify developers' technical requirements on the company's evolving Apex Platform. Peter previously spent 18 years with eWEEK (formerly PC Week), the national news magazine of enterprise technology practice, where he reviewed software development tools and methods and wrote regular columns on emerging technologies and professional community issues.Before he began writing full-time in 1989, Peter spent eleven years in technical and management positions at Exxon and The Aerospace Corporation, including management of the latter company's first desktop computing planning team and applied research in applications of artificial intelligence techniques. He holds an engineering degree from MIT and an MBA from Pepperdine University, he has held teaching appointments in computer science, business analytics and information systems management at Pepperdine, UCLA, and Chapman College.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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