Microsoft Ships .Net Tool Beta

 
 
By Timothy Dyck  |  Posted 2002-08-19 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Web developers who create sites by using Microsoft's ASP .Net script language have a new development tool to try.

Web developers who create sites by using Microsofts ASP .Net script language have a new development tool to try.

Microsoft ASP .Net Web Matrix fills out the companys developer product line nicely because it remains similar to Visual Studio .Net while offering a simpler set of options that focus just on ASP .Net development for Web browser and mobile clients.

Web Matrix is free, so it is easy to distribute to a large group of Web site maintainers.

Web Matrix provides three edit views—graphical, HTML and server-side code—and I had the option of having its wizards generate code in either Visual Basic .Net or C#.

It can automatically generate pages with data-bound controls, security log-in pages, and pages for mobile phones and other small devices (Microsofts Mobile Internet Toolkit has to be installed for the mobile features to work).

Web Matrix also supports ASP .Nets Web services features and can generate proxy classes from a Web Services Description Language file.

However, it lacks a number of Visual Studio .Net features that many developers will miss. At the top of the list for me is statement and method name completion. Once Id gotten used to this in other tools, its hard to go back to typing everything.

Web Matrix also lacks the concept of a project with interfile dependencies and doesnt have integration with source code control systems.

A built-in development Web server permits local testing of projects.

The product can be extended through an online gallery of add-ins.

ASP .Net Web Matrix (now available in a Technology Preview version) can be downloaded from www.asp.net/Tools/redir.aspx?path=webmatrix.

 
 
 
 
Timothy Dyck is a Senior Analyst with eWEEK Labs. He has been testing and reviewing application server, database and middleware products and technologies for eWEEK since 1996. Prior to joining eWEEK, he worked at the LAN and WAN network operations center for a large telecommunications firm, in operating systems and development tools technical marketing for a large software company and in the IT department at a government agency. He has an honors bachelors degree of mathematics in computer science from the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and a masters of arts degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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