Run .Net Code on Pocket PCs

 
 
By Timothy Dyck  |  Posted 2001-12-17 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

One of the main benefits of the Microsoft .Net development platform's use of processor- independent byte code is easy program portability.

One of the main benefits of the Microsoft .Net development platforms use of processor- independent byte code is easy program portability.

The first fruits of this benefit are now available to Pocket PC developers, who can use a Technology Preview release of .Net Compact Framework to write .Net applications for Windows CE-based PDAs and phones. (No such phones are shipping yet.) Apps can be written using the same source code base used for any existing (Windows-based) .Net applications.

.Net Compact Framework includes a .Net just-in-time compiler and run-time environment for Windows CE devices (versions for about 20 CPUs are provided), plus a subset of the .Net Framework that includes most APIs used for client/server development.

The Technology Preview is early code: Although its hosted in Visual Studio .Net, there are no graphical forms builders yet. These will come by the final release in mid-2002. Also, .Net programs I tested on a Compaq iPaq Pocket PC ran quite sluggishly. I was able to run sample applications (including one that accessed a Web service I deployed on a Windows server box) both on the included Pocket PC emulator and on real Pocket PC hardware.

 
 
 
 
Timothy Dyck is a Senior Analyst with eWEEK Labs. He has been testing and reviewing application server, database and middleware products and technologies for eWEEK since 1996. Prior to joining eWEEK, he worked at the LAN and WAN network operations center for a large telecommunications firm, in operating systems and development tools technical marketing for a large software company and in the IT department at a government agency. He has an honors bachelors degree of mathematics in computer science from the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and a masters of arts degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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