Siemens Nudges VOIP Software Away From Proprietary Systems

 
 
By Paula Musich  |  Posted 2003-03-03 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Siemens's Enterprise Networks division last week moved to decouple its VOIP software from proprietary hardware and operating systems with the launch of its HiPath ComScendo communications suite.

Siemens Information and Communication Networks Inc.s Enterprise Networks division last week moved to decouple its VOIP software from proprietary hardware and operating systems with the launch of its HiPath ComScendo communications suite.

ComScendo, which runs on Siemens ICNs HiPath 3000 and 5000 IP PBXes, is aimed at small and midsize companies. It provides an enterprise-class voice communications feature set, including call forwarding and conferencing, as well as least-cost routing and call detail reporting.

The ComScendo suite kicks off a multiyear transition to decouple Siemens ICNs software from vertically integrated proprietary hardware and operating systems, according to officials. The HiPath 5000 core server runs on an Intel Corp. and a Microsoft Corp. Windows-based system.

A slightly different version of ComScendo runs on Siemens ICNs HiPath 4000 IP PBX for large enterprises. ComScendo supports Siemens ICNs OptiPoint digital and IP telephones and its OptiClient 130 software for PCs, as well as third-party IP phones and software.

Siemens ICN, of Boca Raton, Fla., also released OptiClient 130 Version 4.0. The client works with the HiPath 3000 Survivable Media Gateway and HiPath 5000 IP PBX for small and midsize enterprises, as well as the HiPath 4000 IP PBX for large enterprises.

The upgrade adds three new GUI options. Telephone GUI includes a keypad, function keys and a display. EasyCom GUI provides drag-and-drop icons that can be moved into a calling circle to initiate calls. Office GUI provides a series of pull-down menus and check boxes.

Version 4.0 also works with two new Siemens ICN peripheral devices: the OptiPoint Handset, which can be plugged in to a Universal Serial Bus port, and the OptiKeyboard, which includes stereo speakers, a microphone and a telephone handset with a cradle. The devices, which provide better audio quality than a PCs speaker and microphone, work with PCs running Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows ME and Windows XP.

Although Siemens is less well-known in the United States for its VOIP (voice-over-IP) offerings, it has a much greater worldwide presence than rival Cisco Systems Inc., according to Allan Sulkin, president of TeqConsult Group, in Hackensack, N.J.

Siemens ICN last week also introduced a PC-based trading application for financial services and brokerage companies. The HiPath Trading application for PCs, available for the first time in North America, moves trading operations from vertical systems to standard PCs and LANs that can support other applications, officials said.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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