SlickEdit Gets Slicker

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2007-03-14 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The company drops a new version of its popular code editor with a bunch of added features meant to help simplify developers' jobs.

SlickEdit has announced the release of a new version of its eponymous code editor that delivers new features to help developers cut down on performing repetitive tasks. New features in SlickEdit 2007 include a class tool window, XML/HTML formatting, a find-symbol tool window, dynamic surround, a preview tool window, a files tool window, a line ruler, the ability to copy and paste in color, Solaris x86 support, and support for Microsoft Windows Vista. To read a review of Visual SlickEdit 10, click here.
The SlickEdit code editor that allows programmers to code in over 40 languages on eight platforms. Based in Morrisville, N.C, SlickEdit has been in business for 19 years.
Company officials said the SlickEdit technology lives up to its name by enabling developers and development teams to create, navigate, modify, build and debug code faster and more accurately. Guru Jakob Nielsen offers advice on designing applications for usability. Click here to watch the video. "SlickEdit 2007 was developed by power programmers for power programmers," said Scott Westfall, vice president of software development at SlickEdit. "It is the perfect tool for developers who have a passion for coding and a bias toward working in the fastest, most efficient manner."
SlickEdit 2007 pricing starts at $284 for new licenses. Other products available from SlickEdit are the SlickEdit Plug-In for Eclipse and SlickEdit Tools for Microsoft Visual Studio 2005. Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest news, reviews and analysis in programming environments and developer tools.
 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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