The Future of Groovy

By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2008-11-11 Print this article Print


Meanwhile, in a statement, Rocher, who also is chief technology officer as well as co-founder of G2One, said:

"SpringSource and G2One are a terrific fit. Spring and Groovy have long shared a common mission of transforming enterprise Java, making it better, more practical and more powerful for developers. Ruby on Rails showed how frameworks based on simple principles can dramatically improve developer productivity, creativity, and lower maintenance costs. Grails has significantly improved upon those principles and brought the productivity of Rails to the de-facto enterprise Java stack, which is based on Spring."

In addition, SpringSource officials said SpringSource will use its experience working with popular open source projects, like Apache Tomcat, to ensure the future development of the Groovy language.

Laforge said:

"This is really a very important day for Java in the enterprise. SpringSource's portfolio is clearly a huge success in the enterprise, and at the same time, both Groovy and Grails are very successful open source projects which offer a different twist, a different approach to the problems companies are facing. But somehow, the goal is the same: G2One and SpringSource are both fighting the war on complexity. We want to simplify the life of developers, make them more productive, and allow them to deliver scalable and powerful solutions to end-users, more rapidly."

Laforge said the resources SpringSource brings to the table will help make the Eclipse plug-in for Groovy state-of-the-art.

And for Grails, "In addition to great support in Eclipse, you can also expect a closer relationship with the Spring backend, and particularly with projects like Spring MVC and Spring WebFlow," Laforge said. "A closer relationship will definitely improve both Grails and these SpringSource portfolio projects. Also, think of running Grails on SpringSource dm Server, leveraging Spring batch, etc."

In a separate announcement, SpringSource and Terracotta announced a comprehensive partnership to simplify the development and deployment of enterprise Java applications and reduce the costs of their scale-out, tuning and ongoing operations, said officials from both companies.

Under terms of the agreement, SpringSource and Terracotta are tightly integrating their products and providing organizations with key resources and tools for quickly building and supporting specific vertical applications and processes powered by Java infrastructure, the companies said. Terracotta is a Java clustering solution.

As a first step, the two companies have already collaboratively developed reference implementations and best practice design patterns for processes such as authentication and authorization using Terracotta with Spring Security; workflow, using Terracotta and Spring Workflow; and database offload, using Terracotta and Spring MVC, officials from the companies said.

In addition to application reference implementations, Terracotta and SpringSource are working together to more tightly integrate their two solutions to include the SpringSource dm Server. 

Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.

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