Sun Launches New Java Store Beta

By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2009-12-11 Print this article Print

Sun Microsystems delivers a new beta release of its Java Store that updates its look and feel and account and payment options.

Sun Microsystems delivered a beta release of its Java Store Dec. 11 with a new look and feel and new account and payment options.

"The Java Store is a consumer-focused storefront for distributing Java applications. The Java Store lets consumers discover and safely acquire community-provided applications," Sun said on its Website.

In an e-mail to developers participating in the Java Store Beta Program, Sun listed three new features in the Java Store:

"??Ç   New user interface-the latest release of the Java Store Beta delivers an enhanced look-and-feel and easier navigation.

??Ç  Create a Java Store account-account creation enables customization of your Java Store experience, among other benefits.

??Ç  Payment-you can buy applications in the Java Store. Purchases can be made using PayPal. The Simplified Payment option makes buying a quick and easy experience."

Sun described the Java Store on its Website as, "a JavaFX-powered storefront that provides an easy and secure means of discovering and acquiring compelling Java and JavaFX applications. Social networking, games, productivity tools and business applications are examples of what you can download from the Java Store. This easy-to-use storefront is free, and is available for U.S. residents, as part of the Java Store Beta Program."

The Java Store features a "Preview" capability that allows users to "test-drive applications before making a purchase decision. Downloading applications from the Java Store is also simple and easy thanks to the power of Java-simply drag and drop from the Java Store to your computer's desktop and the application is installed," Sun said.

On the Java Warehouse Website, Sun said, "The Java Warehouse is the repository for Java applications submitted by developers for distribution through the Java Store to hundreds of millions of desktops worldwide."

Sun also said, "The Java Warehouse is initially targeted at Java and JavaFX applications meant to run on the desktop with initial distribution through the Java Store. In the future, we plan to further stock the Java Warehouse with applications meant for mobile, TV and cross-screen applications. Future storefronts customized from the Java Store are planned to become available through partnerships, allowing for increased distribution of applications."

In addition, Sun said, "Applications posted on the Java Warehouse for inclusion in the Java Store can be either free or priced between $1.99 and $200. ... Developers are charged an annual membership fee of $50. There is no extra fee for submitting applications."

In an interview with eWEEK in June, James Gosling, the creator of the Java language and champion of Sun's Java Store, said if the Java Store realizes its potential it will make the Apple's App Store look like a "rounding error."

Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.

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