Forte for Java

 
 
By Timothy Dyck  |  Posted 2001-09-10 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Forte for Java

Unlike .net, suns sun one development strategy is not highly dependent on one tool (even its own). Forte for Java 3.0 Enterprise Edition is a strong player in its space, providing a broad feature set.

Like Visual Studio .Net, Forte for Java provides facilities for constructing high-level objects accessible over HTTP, extensive editing support for XML and XSL files, facilities for Web scripting and lower-level programming, database editing tools, and source-code control.

Forte for Java 3.0 Enterprise Edition allowed us to create session and entity EJBs, a major change in the product that will allow it to compete directly with other high-end Java development tools, including Borlands JBuilder Enterprise.

Forte for Java provides a capable Java and JSP editing environment, although it doesnt have the editing elegance that Visual Studio .Net does. For example, Forte for Java lacks niceties such as cross-file search and replace, and variable name completion.

Using its new EJB template wizards, we could create session and entity EJBs and then edit their properties using property windows (this level of support is standard in high-end Java tools these days). We then deployed the test EJBs to both iPlanet Application Server and Suns J2EE (Java2 Enterprise Edition) Reference Implementation server once we had installed both servers and registered them with Forte for Java.

Forte for Java 3.0 Enterprise Edition introduces a new system of Web- enabling JavaBeans and EJBs. Using a new Web Service wizard, we created a base Web service and then chose which Java methods we would like to wrap XML interfaces around.

Unfortunately, when we created Web services using these features, we had to use an XML-based—but otherwise proprietary—Enterprise Service Presentation format, which is accessible through custom JSP tag libraries Sun provides for this purpose.

Sun also ships integration software for Macromedias Dreamweaver and Adobe Systems Inc.s GoLive Web page editing tools to automate the process of adding Enterprise Service Presentation JSP tags for users of these packages.

SOAP support is coming in the next version of Forte for Java.



 
 
 
 
Timothy Dyck is a Senior Analyst with eWEEK Labs. He has been testing and reviewing application server, database and middleware products and technologies for eWEEK since 1996. Prior to joining eWEEK, he worked at the LAN and WAN network operations center for a large telecommunications firm, in operating systems and development tools technical marketing for a large software company and in the IT department at a government agency. He has an honors bachelors degree of mathematics in computer science from the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and a masters of arts degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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