Visual J# .Net: Yesterdays Java

 
 
By Timothy Dyck  |  Posted 2001-12-03 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Microsoft's Visual j# .Net Beta 1, which re-creates an old version of Java as a .Net language, has been a major source of debate among eWeek Labs staffers.

Microsofts Visual j# .Net Beta 1, which re-creates an old version of Java as a .Net language, has been a major source of debate among eWeek Labs staffers.

Visual J# (posted online at msdn.microsoft.com/visualj/jsharp/beta. asp) is a plug-in for Visual Studio .Net Beta 2 that lets developers write applications compatible with Java 1.1.4, the version included in Microsofts ill-fated Visual J++ 6.0. J# contains a clean-room reimplementation of most of the Java 1.1.4 class libraries and compiles Java code to .Net intermediate language byte code, so resulting programs can be run only on .Net-equipped machines.

As a .Net language, Visual J# also provides Java developers with a way to write .Net applications in Java, taking advantage of all the features the .Net framework provides, such as its class library, cross-language authoring and debugging, and very simple creation of Web services.

J# provides a smooth upgrade path for remaining Visual J++ developers (measured at 6 percent of the Java development tools market in Evans Data Corp.s fall study) because J# has the same Java extensions that J++ included.

However, for Java developers who want to write modern Java applications, J# is a bizarre creature—a wizened Java head transplanted onto a .Net body.

Java 1.1.4 is very old now, and with plenty of excellent Java development tools on the market, Visual J++s integrated development environment isnt the draw it once was.

 
 
 
 
Timothy Dyck is a Senior Analyst with eWEEK Labs. He has been testing and reviewing application server, database and middleware products and technologies for eWEEK since 1996. Prior to joining eWEEK, he worked at the LAN and WAN network operations center for a large telecommunications firm, in operating systems and development tools technical marketing for a large software company and in the IT department at a government agency. He has an honors bachelors degree of mathematics in computer science from the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and a masters of arts degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date
Rocket Fuel