WebPutty Unveils Flexible Dev Tool

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2001-12-10 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

WebPutty Inc. on Monday introduced its WebPutty Application Flexibility Server 4.0, a development environment that enables developers to change and extend business systems more quickly than manual coding.

WebPutty Inc. on Monday introduced its WebPutty Application Flexibility Server 4.0, a development environment that enables developers to change and extend business systems more quickly than manual coding. Tightly integrated with Microsoft Corp.s .Net Web services platform, WebPuttys Application Flexibility Server enables organizations to make business system changes that ordinarily would have taken six to nine months to be done in a matter of days, said officials with the San Jose, Calif., company.
With the new WebPutty system, users build applications by describing databases, then attaching business rules and logic to data elements. Users then use the WebPutty Application Flexibility Server to design browser-based access screens and service integration and interoperability interfaces for the data elements, the company said. This process requires no coding.
Key to the systems capabilities is a feature called Application Definition, where an applications properties are stored in a set of tables. Because the data in the Application Definition is programming language-neutral, it can be exported as an XML representation and deployed on other platforms. The system defines and stores an applications properties, including logic, data models, user interface and other data in the Application Definition, making for a single source of information and enabling users to make one change propagate throughout an application. The WebPutty Application Flexibility Server supports XML and SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) and supports rich XML Web services, including the ability to publish WebPutty applications as Web services, the company said.
 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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