General Dynamics Itronix GD8000 Is One Battle-Ready Notebook

 
 
By Frank Ohlhorst  |  Posted 2009-04-17 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

In the realm of tough and sturdy notebooks, champions are far and few between. Sure, there's Panasonic's ToughBooks, Gammatech's Durabooks, and even Dell has a rugged notebook. They're all fine machines, but no one is about to dunk a ToughBook in 30 gallons of water or throw one on concrete over and over. That is where General Dynamics comes in.

The same folks that conceived and built the U.S. Air Force's F-16 Falcon fighter jet and the Marine Corps' Stryker Combat Vehicle are behind the Itronix GD8000 notebook, a military-standard notebook computer. You don't have to be a soldier to appreciate what the GD8000 has to offer. While the unit may be at home on the battlefield, it can be even more useful at a construction site, hospital or police car.
 
The $3,800 Itronix GD8000 is built to take a beating and is loaded with features, including:

  • Magnesium chassis with impact-absorbing polycarbonate casing
  • 13.3-inch DynaVue touch-screen display for outdoor/direct sunlight viewing
  • Ergonomic design, full-size keyboard
  • Weighs 7.9 pounds fully equipped
  • Operating temperature from -22F to 140F
  • Up to 10-hour battery life
  • Integrated GPS and wireless connectivity with Wi-Fi, optional high-powered WLAN and Bluetooth
  • Fingerprint reader, smartcard port
  • Trusted Platform Module 1.2 and optional embedded Computrace software
  • EnergyStar and EPEAT certified

Sizewise, the Itronix GD8000 is a little bit bigger than a traditional notebook. At roughly 10 inches by 12 inches by 2 inches, the Itronix GD8000 Notebook is a little heavy on the arm and too big to hide in a briefcase. But who needs a case with the GD8000? The unit sports an integrated carry handle and closes up tight, eliminating the need for a separate travel case-except of course for the power supply. Users will need to put the power brick somewhere and regrettably, that power brick is full-size. An integrated power supply would prove to be a nice option, allowing users to just carry the PC and a power cord.

>> Click here to read the full review


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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