Why Economic Slowdown May Actually Drive Sales

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2008-12-10 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Douglas and Lew Tucker, Sun's vice president and CTO of cloud computing, both said they believe the slowdown in the overall economy is going to drive a lot of new interest in cloud computing this next year.

"This is particularly true in large enterprises [right now]," Douglas said. "Whereas in the past a more conservative company might have said, 'Well, let's let the cloud mature a few years,' now they are at least taking a serious look before they discount it because it sounds like it might save you money-which is what everybody is trying to do."

"We don't have any crystal balls ... but all we can tell you is that every one of our large enterprise customers is talking to us about where the cloud is going."

Many of Sun's customers are already well-versed in what the cloud offers, Tucker said, so they usually come into the conversation with specific questions.

"They're looking at Google, they're looking at Amazon and other large Internet companies and wondering, 'How the heck are they supporting that kind of infrastructure?'" Tucker said. "And the way they do it is that at times they have a cloud computing model that they're running inside. [These potential customers] are looking to change their IT, and cloud computing is facilitating these changes very quickly.

"They're looking at the economy and asking, 'How are we going to do more with less, or with the same setup they've got?'"




 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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