Cloud Computing: Google, Facebook, Others Aim for Smooth Transition to IPv6

 
 
By Fahmida Y. Rashid  |  Posted 2011-03-08 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
With the last blocks of IPv4 addresses allocated to each of the regional authorities in early February, the clock is ticking on beginning the transition to IPv6, the Internet address protocol that has been around for years. While Linux, Windows and Apple operating systems have been capable of working with IPv6, the Internet backbone and corporate networks have not yet made that jump. Comcast, Time Warner and Verizon are all upgrading their network infrastructure and rolling out IPv6 addresses as a dual-stack configuration to customers and individual companies that are working to ensure their Websites, services and products all support the switch. As all of ISPs and wireless broadband networks go to IPv6, the content providers have no choice but to create mobile content and make it IPv6 aware.??íIPv6 is not backwards-compatible, so users with IPv4 addresses won't be able to access IPv6 sites unless their ISP has dual-stack configuration in place. The same goes for users with only IPv6—unless the Website owner has enabled IPv6 on their pages, they can't see content without using tunnels and other tricks. This is why John Curran, president and CEO of the American Registry for Internet Numbers, is urging Websites to enable IPv6 access to their Websites by Jan. 1, 2012. A number of companies have committed to having their sites ready by World IPv6 Day in June, when the Internet will switch to IPv6 for 24 hours as a test. For those online denizens who already have made the switch, kudos to you, and here is a list of some of the major sites that already are operating on both sides of the Internet namespace.
 
 
 

Google

Google already supports IPv6 on most, if not all, of its products including Search, Docs, Maps and Gmail. IPv6 access to Search was enabled in 2008 and YouTube was added in 2010. Google engineers added IPv6 support as part of their "20 percent project," according to CNET.
Google
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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