Software Makers Defend Their Turf

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2002-07-17 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cable & Wireless, Informatica and Compuware go to court to protect their intellectual property.

July seems to be a popular month for software developers to go to court to protect their intellectual property. Tuesday saw lawsuits from Cable & Wireless USA Inc. in the content delivery network software space and Informatica Corp. in the business analytics software space. These suits followed one involving Compuware Corp. and IBM that came to light Monday in the mainframe systems software space. Cable & Wireless, of Vienna Va., filed a suit in Boston Tuesday against Akamai Technologies Inc. Cable & Wireless claimed that its Cambridge, Mass.-based competitor infringes on a newly issued patent that the company received on July 2.
The lawsuit covers Exodus, a Cable & Wireless Service formed by the integration of Digital Island and Exodus, and encompasses various content deliver algorithms that ensure that only the freshest content is served to Web sites, Cable & Wireless officials said. Cable & Wireless allege that Akamais products, including EdgeSuite, directly infringe on the companys patent.
"We have attempted to get Akamai to acknowledge the broad scope of our intellectual property rights. Instead, theyve responded with multiple lawsuits against us," said Chris Albinson, chief strategy officer for Exodus. Akamai President Paul Sagan said in a statement that he was confident that Akamai does not infringe the new patent. Akamai is "aware of the details of the new patent issued to Cable & Wireless, and it is just another version of the same so-called fingerprinting technology that a jury previously determined Akamai does not infringe," Sagan said, in the statement.


 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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