Storage Not Handled Well Now Could Cause Big Problems Later

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2011-06-27 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Gartner analysts warn that too narrow a focus will force massive reinvestment in two to three years to address the other dimensions of big data, Beyer said.

Worldwide information volume is growing at a minimum rate of 59 percent annually, Gartner said, and while volume is a significant challenge in managing big data, business and IT leaders must focus on information volume, variety and velocity.

Gartner defines those three "V's" as follows:

Volume: The increase in data volumes within enterprise systems is caused by transaction volumes and other traditional data types, as well as by new types of data. Too much volume is a storage issue, but too much data is also a massive analysis issue.

Variety: IT leaders have always had an issue translating large volumes of transactional information into decisions-now there are more types of information to analyze-mainly coming from social media and mobile (context-aware). Variety includes tabular data (databases), hierarchical data, documents, email, metering data, video, still images, audio, stock-ticker data, financial transactions and more.

Velocity: This involves streams of data, structured record creation, and availability for access and delivery. Velocity means both how fast data is being produced and how fast the data must be processed to meet demand.

While big data is a significant issue, Gartner said the more important one is making sense of big data and finding patterns in it that help organizations make better business decisions.

"The ability to manage extreme data will be a core competency of enterprises that are increasingly using new forms of information-such as text, social and context-to look for patterns that support business decisions in what we call pattern-based strategy," said Gartner Vice President and Distinguished Analyst Yvonne Genovese.

"Pattern-based strategy utilizes all the dimensions in its pattern-seeking process. It then provides the basis of the modeling for new business solutions, which allows the business to adapt. The seek-model-and-adapt cycle can then be completed in various mediums, such as social computing analysis or context-aware computing engines."

More analysis is available in the Gartner Special Report "Pattern-Based Strategy: Getting Value from Big Data."

Gartner is staging a webinar July 13 on the report. In it, Genovese will discuss the importance of applying a pattern-based strategy approach to seek, model and adapt to patterns contained in big data. The free webinar will be held July 13 at 9 a.m. EDT and noon EDT.

Go here to register for the webinar.

 




 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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