Deduplication Means Efficiency

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2007-04-13 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Used correctly, deduplication can cut the amount of data by 50 to 90 percent.

EMC brought deduplication to the attention of the IT world with its $165 million acquisition of startup Avamar Technologies in November 2006. Officials with the Hopkinton, Mass., company said this technology was one of the last pieces of the storage puzzle it did not own. Since then, most all storage vendors have been acquiring the technology—or adding their own homemade version—into their product lines. Used correctly, deduplication—which replicates only the unique segments of data that need to be stored—can cut the amount of data by 50 to 90 percent, not only saving storage space but also increasing bandwidth, lowering power and cooling requirements due to "resting" or inactive servers, and saving companies money on the bottom line.
Data Domain, EMC/Avamar, Diligent Technologies and Quantum are among the market leaders in the burgeoning deduplication space. In TheInfoPros Storage Network & Storage Management Wave 8 study in January, a survey of Fortune 1000 IT managers cited Data Domain as the leading vendor in their spending plans for deduplication technology. According to TheInfoPros Technology Heat Index, a measure of users spending and implementation plans, Data Domain was listed as the lead "in plan" deduplication vendor, generating twice as many responses as its nearest competitor.
Deduplication is one of the leading storage trends. Click here to read more. In October 2006, Data Domain introduced the DDX array—what officials claimed was the industrys first data center-scale deduplicating protection storage array. Now, more than 700 customers are using the product, and that number is growing, said Frank Slootman, president and CEO of Data Domain. Quantum is using deduplication technology acquired via its August 2006 ADIC (Advanced Digital Information Corp.) acquisition (which previously had acquired Rocksoft) in both disk- and virtual-tape-based backup products. Diligent, an up-and-coming player in the space, deduplicates data using a proprietary algorithm while the data is on its way into the backup target, which, in Diligents case, is a VTL (virtual tape library).
Avamars founder and president, Jed Yueh, whose nearly 500 customers include half of the Fortune 50 companies, told eWEEK that "data deduplication technology can transform archaic [digital tape] procedures, enabling automated, encrypted disaster recovery across existing wide-area networks and accelerating the shift to disk as the de facto medium for data protection." Although the market often lumps deduplication solutions together, differences in implementation lead to significant differences in customer benefits. "For instance, in real-world customer deployments, Avamar has seen as high as 588-1 daily reduction in network traffic and data storage for backups, a rate of efficiency that dwarfs the competition," Yueh said. "Most of our competitors deduplicate at the target, after the backup server has requested resource-taxing full and incremental backups. Avamar, on the other hand, eliminates the avalanche before it happens, at the source." This also provides a critical, differentiating benefit: the ability to network-mount point-in-time backups to use in conjunction with external applications such as search or document classification, Yueh said. "In the end, I believe data deduplication will become a foundation technology for tomorrows information infrastructure," Yueh said. Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest news, reviews and analysis on enterprise and small business storage hardware and software.
 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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