Fujitsu Deploys Japan's Fastest Clustered HPC System

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2009-08-07 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fujitsu says the new supercomputer system achieved a LINPACK benchmark performance of 97.94 teraflops. Compared with other cluster systems included in the June world Top500 list, the system's performance ranks first in Japan and 34th in the world, Fujitsu says.

Fujitsu on Aug. 7 revealed that it has completed deployment of a new clustered supercomputer for Japan's Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, or RIKEN, that the company claimed was benchmarked as the fastest HPC system in Japan.

Fujitsu said the new supercomputer system achieved a LINPACK benchmark performance of 97.94 teraflops. Compared with other cluster systems included in the June world Top500 list, the system's performance ranks first in Japan and 34th in the world, the company said.

The IBM BladeCenter-clustered Roadrunner HPC system, located at the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory, in Los Alamos, N.M., is currently benchmarked as the world's fastest computer system.

The BladeCenter cluster can process up to 1.105 petaflops (quadrillions of floating-point operations per second). The system in June 2008 became the first to break the petaflop LINPACK barrier.

The LINPACK benchmark is the universal standard used by the Top500 project, which compares the performance of supercomputers and publishes results every six months.

The new Fujitsu system, called the RICC (RIKEN Integrated Cluster of Clusters), comprises three computing subsystems: a massively parallel PC cluster, a large-capacity memory server and multipurpose parallel PC cluster. Each computing subsystem is connected to a common front-end system, and disk and tape systems.

The massively parallel PC cluster is made up of 1,024 Fujitsu Primergy RX200 S5 PC servers, with 2,048 CPUs (8,192 cores), Fujitsu said.

Other components in the operating environment include Parallelnavi, Fujitsu's HPC middleware that integrates the system management functions, plus a high-speed parallel file system and program-development environment.

 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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