How to Deploy Higher-Level Building Blocks for Web 2.0 and Cloud Computing Data Centers

 
 
By John Busch  |  Posted 2009-09-29 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Today's Web 2.0 and cloud computing data centers have reached a critical juncture, as demand for their services has collided with existing architectures and technologies. Today's data centers are reeling from the high costs of power, capital equipment, network connectivity and space, and are hindered by serious performance, scalability and application complexity issues. Web 2.0 and cloud computing enterprises must focus all resources on their core business of providing leading-edge application services. Here, Knowledge Center contributor John Busch explains why higher-level building blocks are needed to effectively exploit these advanced Web 2.0 and cloud computing technologies.

Today's data centers are at a critical juncture in their development. The full potential of Web 2.0 and cloud computing technologies has been hindered by spiraling power costs, unprecedented complexity, and limitations in the existing IT architectures that support these technologies. Existing architectures were never designed to support the rapid growth of data, users and traffic in the Web 2.0 world. To addresses these challenges, the industry is beginning to move to "data center 2.0," where new approaches to data management, scaling and power consumption give businesses the room they need to grow.

These 2.0 data centers leverage standard low-cost x86 servers, Gigabit Ethernet interconnect and open-source software to build scale-out applications with tiering, data and application partitioning, dynamic RAM (DRAM)-based content caching servers and application-layer node failure tolerance.

These loosely coupled architectures have enabled service scaling-but at a very high price. Today's data centers are reeling from the high costs of power, capital equipment, network connectivity and space. They are also hindered by serious performance, scalability and application complexity issues.

Advances in multi-core processors, flash memory and low-latency interconnects offer tremendous potential improvements in performance and power at the component level, but adapting them to realize such benefits requires major engineering and research efforts. Because Web 2.0 and cloud computing enterprises must focus on their core business, higher-level building blocks are needed that can exploit these advanced technologies.



 
 
 
 
Dr. John Busch is President, CEO and co-founder of Schooner Information Technology. John has more than 25 years of industry experience. Prior to Schooner, he was research director of computer system architecture and analysis at Sun Microsystems laboratories from 1999 through 2006. In this role, he led research explorations in chip multiprocessing, advanced multi-tier clustered systems for deployment of Internet-based services, and advanced HPC systems. He received the top President's Award for Innovation at Sun, and oversaw many division technology transfers. Prior to Sun, he was VP of engineering and business partnerships with Diba, Inc., and was general manager of the Diba division after Sun acquired Diba in 1997. From 1989 to 1994, he was co-founder and CTO/VP of engineering of Clarity Software, and led creation of advanced multimedia composition and communication products for Sun, HP and IBM computer systems. From 1976 to 1993, he led many successful R&D programs at Hewlett-Packard in Computer Systems Research and Development. John holds a Ph.D. in Computer Systems Architecture from UCLA, a Master's degree in mathematics from UCLA, a Master's degree in computer science from Stanford University, and attended the Sloan Program at Stanford University. He can be reached at dr.john.busch@schoonerinfotech.com.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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