Do Regular Fire Drill Rebuilds and Restores

 
 
By Brent Ozar  |  Posted 2010-01-14 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


4. Do regular fire drill rebuilds and restores

Do a restore from tape at least once a quarter. Treat it like a real restore need, as though a developer lost something and needs it back from tape. Then, restore it.

5. Keep management informed on restore time estimates

Every quarter, I look at the backup sizes and speeds and estimate how long it will take to restore a server from tape. I put that information into a written report to management that includes, for each server, a cost estimate for decreasing that outage window. Sometimes, the answer is third-party backup compression software; other times it may be more CPU power for the server or adding more memory. The primary goal is to give management enough information to make a good business decision about whether the method for reducing the outage window is worth the money. The secondary goal is to have documentation so, when a restore takes too long, you can show why it may be time to revisit a previous business decision.

6. Trust no one

Once a month, bring an external FireWire or USB into the office, hook it up to the server hosting the network share, and copy the entire backup share to that drive. This will take some time but that's okay. In today's security-conscious world, it's a good idea to then put it in a bank safe deposit box. Nobody should ever need to do this, but sometimes even the best backup administrators make mistakes.

7. Have solid backup and disaster recovery plans in place before you move to the cloud

It can be dangerous to put all your data in someone else's hands without having your own backup and recovery plan in place. It's possible for everything to be temporarily lost from a hosted service. If you don't have your own backup plan to protect your organization's data, a cloud service's problems with data loss can result not just in annoying inconvenience for users, but it can have serious consequences for the business when business-critical information disappears. Don't just assume your data is safe in the cloud-back it up yourself.

Database backup and recovery is becoming more difficult and complicated, especially with today's explosion of data growth and the continually increasing need for data security. These steps do not represent an exhaustive list, but they are a good start to forming a sound database backup and recovery strategy. Most importantly, they allow for a single DBA to perform a complete backup and recovery operation, minimizing the chance of error that can occur when multiple people are involved in the process.

Brent Ozar is Quest Software's SQL Server domain expert and a Microsoft SQL Server MVP. Brent has a decade of broad IT experience that includes systems administration, project management and database administration. In his current role, Brent specializes in database performance tuning, SANs and data warehousing. Previously, Brent spent six years at UniFocus, a hospitality metrics company. Brent conducts training sessions, has written several technical articles, and blogs at www.brentozar.com. He is a regular speaker at PASS events, editor-in-chief of SQLServerPedia.com, and co-author of the book, "Professional SQL Server 2008 Internals and Troubleshooting." He can be reached at brent.ozar@quest.com.



 
 
 
 
Brent Ozar is Quest Software's SQL Server domain expert and a Microsoft SQL Server MVP. Brent has a decade of broad IT experience that includes systems administration, project management and database administration. In his current role, Brent specializes in database performance tuning, SANs and data warehousing. Previously, Brent spent six years at UniFocus, a hospitality metrics company. Brent conducts training sessions, has written several technical articles, and blogs at www.brentozar.com. He is a regular speaker at PASS events, editor-in-chief of SQLServerPedia.com, and co-author of the book, "Professional SQL Server 2008 Internals and Troubleshooting." He can be reached at brent.ozar@quest.com.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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