Data Storage: IBM and Storage: Top Five Trends for 2012

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2012-01-30 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Storage is being looked at with new eyes as CIOs and CEOs see that storage is a critical component of managing big data, the Internet-of-things, cloud and analytics. Smarter storage is necessary for businesses to stay ahead as data continues to explode-to 2.7 zettabytes in 2012, up 48 percent from 2011. In fact, 57 percent of IT decision makers from a 2011 IBM survey stated that their organizations need a new storage approach to manage future growth. As storage becomes a key business driver in 2012, IBM officials said the industry will see new breakthroughs in storage research and business models coming from sectors such as entertainment and health care. Meanwhile, technologies such as IBM SmartCloud can enable organizations, their employees and partners to get what they need when they need it, from advanced analytics and business applications to IT infrastructure such as virtual servers and storage to access to tools for testing software code. IBM officials said all this can be deployed securely across IBM's global network of cloud data centers. With these new storage challenges and opportunities, Steve Wojtowecz, vice president of storage software development at IBM, outlined the five storage trends that will emerge in 2012.
 
 
 

Storage Breakthroughs Nip at -Digital Dark Age'

The volume of digital data will grow to 2.7 zettabytes in 2012, up 48 percent from 2011. Still, digital storage often can be more perishable than paper. Disks corrode, bits rot and hardware becomes obsolete, all of which could create a Digital Dark Age, where digital storage techniques and formats created today quickly become antiquated. The floppy disk is a good example. But storage mediums can be much denser, solid state disks offer more stable longer-term preservation of data, and the cloud allows access to data anywhere, anytime. Recently, IBM researchers unveiled Racetrack memory, which could lead to a new type of data-centric computing that allows massive amounts of stored data to be accessed in less than a billionth of a second.
Storage Breakthroughs Nip at -Digital Dark Age'
 
 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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