Startup Gear6 Readies New Centralized Cache for NAS/NFS

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2006-10-19 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

New centralized cache development allows data to be accessed and shared by multiple applications and hundreds—or even thousands—of clients.

Gear6, a 2-year-old Menlo Park, Calif., startup that makes an appliance that accelerates NAS/NFS deployments, announced mid-October it is testing a beta version of the industrys first centralized storage caching product for the data center. This marks the first time that high-capacity, high-performance cache can be deployed as a scalable, shared network resource, a company spokesperson said. The new Gear6 development closes a performance gap experienced by a number of IT systems, the spokesperson said—a gap created by decades of server and CPU advances that have left disk data access, a purely mechanical process, far behind.
Gear6 provides increased I/O throughput, reduces disk access time from milliseconds to microseconds, and scales to terabytes of capacity, the spokesperson said.
This new approach complements existing NAS/NFS deployments and installs transparently in the data center without requiring changes to current applications or infrastructure, the spokesperson added. Data center managers have had difficulty overcoming inherent capacity constraints and limited sharing capabilities involving server or storage device caching. Centralizing cache allows data to be accessed and shared by multiple applications and hundreds—or even thousands—of clients.
Centralized storage caching fits a broad range of applications—including transaction processing and other database workloads—and industries. Click here to read more about data caching. Any application that is I/O-intensive or requires rapid data access will realize immediate performance improvements and improved quality of service, the Gear6 spokesperson said. "The business goals of almost every strategic IT initiative are to improve performance and user experience while reducing costs and complexity," said Michael Dortch, principal business analyst and IT infrastructure management practice leader at Robert Frances Group in Westport, Conn. "The innovative shared network caching offered by Gear6 helps enterprises to achieve these goals by overcoming the latency and throughput constraints of traditional disk-based storage systems. "In addition, the Gear6 solution interoperates seamlessly with incumbent data center infrastructures, maximizing business benefits while minimizing operational disruption and additional complexity. Such features should appeal to almost any organization that relies upon IT to do business—which today is almost every enterprise." The Gear6 product is currently in beta testing, and general availability will be announced in the coming months. More information is available at the Gear6 Web site. Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest news, reviews and analysis on enterprise and small business storage hardware and software.
 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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