Storage Web Digest: STORServer Unveils Smaller Backup Appliances

 
 
By eweek  |  Posted 2003-05-28 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

STORServer this week announced a new line of rack-mounted backup appliances that incorporate a Sony AIT library.
  • Punch Networks' New Paris storage appliances
  • Fixed Content Retention Should Grab IT Managers' Attention
  • Punching Up Virtualization ... STORServer Unveils Smaller Backup Appliances With AIT ... Fixed Content Retention Should Grab IT Managers Attention

    Enterprise Storage

    Punching Up Virtualization

    Punch Networks announced a new suite of Punch Paris storage appliances. The Punch Paris server software is an application-level secure storage virtualization solution, which until now has been appropriate for larger-scale data center environments, the company said. Punch Networks President, Chairman, and founder David Campbell said the companys new products differ from storage virtualization in that "we do it at the application level, not at the I/O level," with SDKs and APIs for application integration. "Virtualization companies focus on access across the network, but our view is that is just the start of it. The files at the center of it have to be absolutely secure," he said.

    Read the full story on:Enterprise IT Planet

     

    STORServer Unveils Smaller Backup Appliances With AIT

    Storage vendor STORServer announced this week a new line of rack-mounted backup appliances that incorporate Sony Electronics Advanced Intelligent Tape (AIT) library. The Y1, Y100, and Y1000 backup devices all use Sonys 2U-sized LIB-162 tape library—which features one or two tape drives and 16 cartridge slots—packed into a 6U chassis. The three models vary in the number of tape drives they include and the amount of disk cache.

    Read the full story on: Techweb

     

    Storage Business

    Fixed Content Retention Should Grab IT Managers Attention

    Users need to start evaluating their options regarding storage of fixed content data in the light of analyst predictions that it will consume more than half of a corporations storage resources by 2005. Unlike transaction-based data, which has a short useful lifespan, fixed content data must be kept for long periods of time, often to comply with retention periods and provisions that government regulations such as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Analyst firms such as The Yankee Group expect that the market for fixed content data will grow from 308,000 terabytes this year to 1,251,900 terabytes in 2006. The Enterprise Storage Group said that fixed content reference information will represent 54 percent of all data by 2005 and will grow faster than that of traditional transaction-based and file-oriented storage.

    Read the full story on:Network World

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

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