Database Security Suite Makes Tracking More Granular

 
 
By Lisa Vaas  |  Posted 2004-07-27 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

An update of Guardium's software adds new assessment, access policy control and auditing capabilities, as well as applications to help companies track compliance with regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley.

Guardium Inc., a maker of relational database security software, is putting new assessment, access policy control, auditing and regulatory compliance applications into an update, the company plans to announce Monday. SQL Guard Security Suite is designed to offer real-time, continuous protection of databases. The three new applications are SQL HealthGuard, SQL PolicyGuard and SQL AuditGuard. The SQL HealthGuard module offers metrics, methodologies and visual tools via two capabilities: Security Health Assessment and Client Server Access Map.
The first monitors, measures and reports on database security using what the company describes as a graphical security health report card in a dashboard view that can double as a portal for status reports.
Database health is gauged by comparison with prebuilt security attributes that can be customized with user-created metrics. Results are displayed in actionable, real-time and historical graphs. The Client Server Access Map capability tracks client-server interaction and draws a graphical representation of such interactions. The maps components include Database Server, Application Server and Network connection and can be clicked on for high-level or drill-down analysis. The SQL PolicyGuard module has auto-baselining and real-time, policy-based access control capabilities. These are used to develop database access rules and to enable database access control. The auto-baselining capability automatically correlates database access data to create access baselines or rules. Users can set real-time, policy-based alerts using their own access rules, a particular baseline or SQL Guards preconfigured best practices.
The SQL AuditGuard module monitors database access and is designed to streamline auditing and regulatory compliance reporting by eliminating the need to slog through database logs. Such a capability should help enterprises track compliance with regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley, GLBA, HIPAA or SB 1386, for example. Just because security is being legislated vigorously doesnt mean enterprises are secure. Click here to read more insights from the Business4Site conference. Noel Yuhanna, an analyst with Forrester Research Inc., in Santa Clara, Calif., said Guardium is doing a good job expanding its platform in order to offer the tracking granularity required by such regulations. "Theyre expanding to provide an integrated solution for more secure environments to do auditing of the entire environment," he said. "This definitely helps in Sarbanes-Oxley requirements, where you need to know who accessed what data, when it was changed and by whom. It gives you a granular analysis of such data access." The updates previous iteration is being used by the director of network services at a major New England media firm who requested that his name and company name be withheld. He said that from the network security perspective, Guardiums platform is a blessing, since it provides checks and balances between the DBAs (database administrators) who are primarily responsible for enforcement of database security and the network administrators who guard the perimeter of an enterprise. "What Guardium does, it divorces two entities," he said. "It ensures that one entity will do what it says its doing. As an example: Out of the box, you dont use the default, vendor-provided password. You can say, Hey, DBA, did you change that? They could say yes or no. But … you can monitor that from the network perspective; you can ensure what he or she said is being performed and done." Thats essential for any company that falls under the rules of Sarbanes-Oxley, the network services director pointed out, since the regulation stipulates that an enterprise provide such checks and balances. Next Page: Fortune 500 companies are awaiting security solutions from big-name vendors.



 
 
 
 
Lisa Vaas is News Editor/Operations for eWEEK.com and also serves as editor of the Database topic center. Since 1995, she has also been a Webcast news show anchorperson and a reporter covering the IT industry. She has focused on customer relationship management technology, IT salaries and careers, effects of the H1-B visa on the technology workforce, wireless technology, security, and, most recently, databases and the technologies that touch upon them. Her articles have appeared in eWEEK's print edition, on eWEEK.com, and in the startup IT magazine PC Connection. Prior to becoming a journalist, Vaas experienced an array of eye-opening careers, including driving a cab in Boston, photographing cranky babies in shopping malls, selling cameras, typography and computer training. She stopped a hair short of finishing an M.A. in English at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. She earned a B.S. in Communications from Emerson College. She runs two open-mic reading series in Boston and currently keeps bees in her home in Mashpee, Mass.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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