MySQL vs. the Lite Databases: A Fair Comparison?

 
 
By Lisa Vaas  |  Posted 2005-12-29 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Opinion: Not to pick on MySQL or anything, but does it really makes sense to compare it to the light versions of proprietary databases? I thought not, but MySQL users say I'm all wet.

Not to pick on MySQL—Im glad to see they were picked to be editors choice in Builder AUs recent road test of databases, which compared MySQL, SQL Server Express, DB2 Express and Oracle 10g Standard Edition. "Release 5.0 of MySQL is really taking it to…Oracle and DB2 with advanced features such as cluster support and fault tolerance, and in most other departments the features run head to head with the competition," the review reads. "MySQL V5.0 is a compelling product and it is hard to argue against its nomination for the Editors Choice award." But is the premise of the review actually sound? For the purpose of comparing MySQL to the "lite" versions of the proprietary databases, Builder AU created a hypothetical online business, relatively small, that sells books and DVDs.
The business needs to grow, so it needs a database that can scale from a dual processor or four-way server on up to a small server farm.
As a colleague pointed out to me, the premise appears wobbly, given that the express database versions are meant to be marketing tools or to be used as embedded databases for certain applications. The databases are hobbled for a purpose: Theyre just there to give people a taste, in hopes that theyll go on to upgrade to full-scale versions. A Microsoft spokesperson put it this way. There are three target audiences for SQL Server Express: nonprofessionals, including students and enthusiasts, whom Redmond hopes to hook early and often and to infuse with SQL Server 2005-compatible skills theyll take into the job marketplace; ISVs, for use in light applications, trial versions, desktop applications, and/or distributed applications with many low-scale databases replicating back to a central hub (hub and spoke) such as retail/branch scenarios; and within companies, for the same types of situations as the ISVs face.
"In general, it would not be a product that an enterprise would run its whole business on," the spokesperson told me. It certainly makes sense for an ISV to base an application on lite versions of Microsoft or Oracle or IBM databases, since it helps to get their foot in the door at larger companies. But Microsoft isnt aware of any ISVs that are entirely based on SQL Server Express. Some may exist, given that Microsoft has had over 500 ISVs sign the redistribution agreement for Express (to distribute it free), but none came to mind when I asked. So I asked some MySQL users and Bell Micro—which packages the Linux stack onto servers—if they had or would ever consider using one of the "lite" proprietary databases instead of MySQL. Most of them were befuddled by the question. Its easy to answer the question of why theyd choose MySQL to run a business on—"Its fast, its cheap, its simple to develop for, and it has low administration overhead," said Ian Wilkes, operations director for Linden Lab, in an e-mail exchange. And as far as ISVs go, companies like ActiveGrid and Bell Micro are built around the LAMP stack, so the question is similar to asking if theyd consider Windows instead of Linux. Its just not in their DNA to ever have considered going with a proprietary database. And then there are the labor costs. Wilkes warned me not to underestimate the importance of developer costs and of ease of development. "Good DBAs are very expensive, but with MySQL, they are often unnecessary," he wrote. Click here to read more about MySQL 5. And, even though its common to point to MySQLs slower performance and fewer capabilities when compared to the commercial databases, Wilkes pointed out that the truth of performance really boils down to workload and developer habits. Besides, for many of the highly interactive, Web-based applications out there, MySQL performs just fine, he noted. Linden Labs is the creator of the online world Second Life, so Wilkes certainly knows of what he speaks. So its easy to see why MySQL would fit the online book and DVD seller scenario. But the limited user, limited CPU versions of the proprietary databases? Would anybody really consider those for such a venture, in spite of what the vendors themselves intend? Its a holiday week. Neither Microsoft nor IBM nor Oracle could turn up people who use their lite versions, else Id have asked them if they considered MySQL for whatever theyre doing. MySQL users are apparently all at work, though, and a few were happy to talk about why they dont find the premise of running a business on a lite version preposterous at all. Next Page: Users delighted.



 
 
 
 
Lisa Vaas is News Editor/Operations for eWEEK.com and also serves as editor of the Database topic center. Since 1995, she has also been a Webcast news show anchorperson and a reporter covering the IT industry. She has focused on customer relationship management technology, IT salaries and careers, effects of the H1-B visa on the technology workforce, wireless technology, security, and, most recently, databases and the technologies that touch upon them. Her articles have appeared in eWEEK's print edition, on eWEEK.com, and in the startup IT magazine PC Connection. Prior to becoming a journalist, Vaas experienced an array of eye-opening careers, including driving a cab in Boston, photographing cranky babies in shopping malls, selling cameras, typography and computer training. She stopped a hair short of finishing an M.A. in English at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. She earned a B.S. in Communications from Emerson College. She runs two open-mic reading series in Boston and currently keeps bees in her home in Mashpee, Mass.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...

 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel