Oracle Offers Hosted Database

 
 
By Matthew Hicks  |  Posted 2002-03-31 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Oracle is taking the skills it learned hosting its enterprise applications in the Oracle.com ASP and applying them to a broader base of potential customers – anyone who uses the Oracle database.

REDWOOD SHORES, Calif. – Oracle Corp. is taking the skills it learned hosting its enterprise applications in the Oracle.com ASP and applying them to a broader base of potential customers – anyone who uses the Oracle database. The company this week will introduce a new service to manage companies Oracle namesake database and application server in a hosted setting. This is an extension of Oracle.coms basic service, which is hosting the Oracle eBusiness Suite of applications. Customers can run any application on top of the database and app server.
Oracle can manage the software remotely or, for a slightly larger fee, house the data in its own facilities and run the software on its own hardware, according to Oracle.com President Tim Chou.
"It hasnt happened in a standardized way, but we have about 200 customers right now," said Chou, in an interview at Oracle headquarters here. For customers who run their software on Oracle-owned hardware, the service will be priced at 5 percent of whatever the customer was already paying for its license to run the Oracle database or application server. For ones that own their own servers the price is 3 percent of the software license.
 
 
 
 
Matthew Hicks As an online reporter for eWEEK.com, Matt Hicks covers the fast-changing developments in Internet technologies. His coverage includes the growing field of Web conferencing software and services. With eight years as a business and technology journalist, Matt has gained insight into the market strategies of IT vendors as well as the needs of enterprise IT managers. He joined Ziff Davis in 1999 as a staff writer for the former Strategies section of eWEEK, where he wrote in-depth features about corporate strategies for e-business and enterprise software. In 2002, he moved to the News department at the magazine as a senior writer specializing in coverage of database software and enterprise networking. Later that year Matt started a yearlong fellowship in Washington, DC, after being awarded an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellowship for Journalist. As a fellow, he spent nine months working on policy issues, including technology policy, in for a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives. He rejoined Ziff Davis in August 2003 as a reporter dedicated to online coverage for eWEEK.com. Along with Web conferencing, he follows search engines, Web browsers, speech technology and the Internet domain-naming system.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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