Study: Oracle9i Tops IBMs DB2 in Manageability

 
 
By Lisa Vaas  |  Posted 2003-04-28 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Also at Oracle Users conference, HP announces pricing deal for customers who buy Oracle software with HP hardware.

IOUG Live! conference attendees on Monday were greeted with two pieces of good news: that Hewlett-Packard Co. is chopping an incremental 20 percent off of hardware when customers purchase Oracle Corp. software with HP hardware, and that Oracles Oracle9i database is easier to use than IBMs DB2. The news was announced at keynotes that kicked off the International Oracle Users Group conference, an event that was expected to draw more than 2,000 DBAs (database administrators). In a morning keynote, E.J. Bodnar, director of marketing for HP Americas Business Critical Systems, announced a pricing deal that would take an incremental 20 percent off of combined HP/Oracle hardware and software purchases.
Speaking with eWEEK before his keynote, Bodnar said that the price cut for joint customers was HPs way of helping customers who are looking to consolidate. "Customers are looking to do more for less," he said. "Were very focused and have had success in helping those customers consolidate on databases, servers and storage."
In separate news, according to a new study, Oracle9i beat out IBMs DB2 when it comes to manageability, Oracle Senior Vice President Andrew Mendelsohn was expected to announce in his afternoon keynote. The study was conducted by independent research firm Rauch Associates Inc. It found that Oracle DBAs (database administrators) required 54 percent less time than their DB2 counterparts to perform equivalent jobs. Also, the study found that Oracle9i is easier to manage, requiring 41 percent less administrative steps than DB2. In a statement released before the keynote, Rauch Associates CEO Ken Rauch said that such efficiency could result in cost savings of up to $37,054 per DBA in the first year of ownership. "Manageability cost differences of this magnitude continue to be a major database purchasing requirement for customers," said Rauch in the statement. "Choosing the right database that will make daily database administration tasks simpler, faster and less error-prone for DBAs directly impacts a companys ability to save costs in IT staffing and management." According to the study, titled "Comparison of Management Cost of Ownership: Oracle9i Database Release 2 and IBM DB2 v8.1," Oracle9i beat out DB2 in the areas of self-tuning, simplification of complex management functions, increased automation of routine tasks, and sophisticated management tools. The study measured management costs for time and effort required to complete 12 basic database management tasks having to do with database setup and configuration, ongoing database administration, performance tuning, and backup and recovery.


 
 
 
 
Lisa Vaas is News Editor/Operations for eWEEK.com and also serves as editor of the Database topic center. Since 1995, she has also been a Webcast news show anchorperson and a reporter covering the IT industry. She has focused on customer relationship management technology, IT salaries and careers, effects of the H1-B visa on the technology workforce, wireless technology, security, and, most recently, databases and the technologies that touch upon them. Her articles have appeared in eWEEK's print edition, on eWEEK.com, and in the startup IT magazine PC Connection. Prior to becoming a journalist, Vaas experienced an array of eye-opening careers, including driving a cab in Boston, photographing cranky babies in shopping malls, selling cameras, typography and computer training. She stopped a hair short of finishing an M.A. in English at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. She earned a B.S. in Communications from Emerson College. She runs two open-mic reading series in Boston and currently keeps bees in her home in Mashpee, Mass.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...

 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel