Yukon Learns a New Lingo

 
 
By Timothy Dyck  |  Posted 2001-07-02 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

At last month's tech-ed conference, Microsoft gave the first public demonstration of the next release of its SQL Server database, code-named Yukon.

At last months tech-ed conference, Microsoft gave the first public demonstration of the next release of its SQL Server database, code-named Yukon.

Its very early in the development process (Yukon wont ship until 2003, eons from now), but Microsofts key directions are becoming clear: a long-term move toward native XML support in the database (including use of XQuery to retrieve data) and support for the new .Net languages and run-time environment.

Microsoft plans to convert Exchanges Web Storage System to use SQL Server.

I got a private backstage demo of an early build of Yukon from Lyle Curry, Microsoft SQL Server product planner (see photo), who let me see firsthand the new language abilities of Yukon.

His demo used a SQL-stored procedure written in C#. The code parsed an incoming XML stream to extract search keywords and then looked up related data in the database, in an Exchange message store and in the file system (all these are searchable through .Net APIs). That information was combined into an XML output document that was then transformed using XSLT (Extensible Style Language Transformation) into an HTML page displayed in a browser.

Yukon also drops SQL Servers current Query Analyzer tool for a new tool called SQL Server Workbench that is based on the Visual Studio .Net IDE. The change provides benefits such as SQL command completion.

 
 
 
 
Timothy Dyck is a Senior Analyst with eWEEK Labs. He has been testing and reviewing application server, database and middleware products and technologies for eWEEK since 1996. Prior to joining eWEEK, he worked at the LAN and WAN network operations center for a large telecommunications firm, in operating systems and development tools technical marketing for a large software company and in the IT department at a government agency. He has an honors bachelors degree of mathematics in computer science from the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and a masters of arts degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...

 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel