Geekspeak: December 18, 2000

 
 
By Peter Coffee  |  Posted 2000-12-18 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

In director Stanley Kubrick's prescient "2001: A Space Odyssey," Kubrick and collaborator Arthur C. Clarke envisioned a spacecraft the length of a football field with a master computer that knew the condition of every system on board.

Tiny Node Could Make Connections

In director Stanley Kubricks prescient "2001: A Space Odyssey," Kubrick and collaborator Arthur C. Clarke envisioned a spacecraft the length of a football field with a master computer that knew the condition of every system on board. Any engineer would wonder if the wiring for all those sensors made up most of the spacecrafts mass. However, Ipsil, of Cambridge, Mass., is right on Kubrick and Clarkes timetable with its under-$1 TCP/IP chip that could put hordes of consumer and industrial devices on streamlined, IP-based networks.

Born of a graduate students attempt to break a Guinness world record for the smallest such device, Ipsils FlowStack architecture implements a TCP/IP node in a mere 5,000 gates (the basic building blocks of an application-specific integrated circuit). Ipsil founder Shri Shrikumar deployed the worlds smallest Web server in June 1999. Shrikumar expects to deliver FlowStack development kits before years end, with silicon implementation by the third quarter of next year. More information is available at www.ipsil.com.

 
 
 
 
Peter Coffee is Director of Platform Research at salesforce.com, where he serves as a liaison with the developer community to define the opportunity and clarify developers' technical requirements on the company's evolving Apex Platform. Peter previously spent 18 years with eWEEK (formerly PC Week), the national news magazine of enterprise technology practice, where he reviewed software development tools and methods and wrote regular columns on emerging technologies and professional community issues.Before he began writing full-time in 1989, Peter spent eleven years in technical and management positions at Exxon and The Aerospace Corporation, including management of the latter company's first desktop computing planning team and applied research in applications of artificial intelligence techniques. He holds an engineering degree from MIT and an MBA from Pepperdine University, he has held teaching appointments in computer science, business analytics and information systems management at Pepperdine, UCLA, and Chapman College.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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