Lenovo Embraces Dual-Core

 
 
By Jeffrey Burt  |  Posted 2005-05-30 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Lenovo Group Ltd. last week, in conjunction with Intel Corp.'s rollout of its new dual-core Pentium D chip and 945G chip set, unveiled its latest desktop models, the ThinkCentre M52 and A52.

Less than a month after closing on the $1.75 billion deal for IBMs PC business, Lenovo Group Ltd. last week, in conjunction with Intel Corp.s rollout of its new dual-core Pentium D chip and 945G chip set, unveiled its latest desktop models, the ThinkCentre M52 and A52.

Lenovo also announced plans for a center at its U.S. facility in Research Triangle Park, N.C., that is designed to bring together partners, software makers and customers to fuel innovation in the PC industry. Among those that will help create the center are IBM, Intel, Microsoft Corp., LANDesk Software Inc. and Symantec Corp.

Dilip Bhatia, program director of Lenovos worldwide ThinkCentre brand, said the upgraded desktops were part of IBMs plans before the purchase. "This was already on the road map," Bhatia said. "For our customers, its business as usual."

Lenovo, with U.S. headquarters in Purchase, N.Y., joined other PC makers in embracing the new technology from Intel, of Santa Clara, Calif. Intel officials expect the dual-core Pentium D and 945G will drive the development of desktop offerings for the foreseeable future.

Hewlett-Packard Co., of Palo Alto, Calif., last week launched its xw4300 Workstation and Compaq dc7600 business desktop PC series, both of which are based on the new technology. Dell Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, will outfit its Precision 380 Workstation with the new Intel offerings, a spokesperson said.

Lenovos Bhatia said the new ThinkCentres will be available in mid-June and will feature the companys ThinkVantage and Embedded Security Subsystem.

John Lally, director of product management at Interland Inc., in Atlanta, said he expects client-side dual-core processing to help some areas of the industry. "Dual-core processing will greatly expand computing from a client, workstation and server standpoint," Lally said. However, he said, "Client-side dual-core seems like something that ... would only benefit niche processor-intensive applications."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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