AirZip Locks Down Attachments

 
 
By Peter Coffee  |  Posted 2002-12-02 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

E-mail would become more useful, and less dangerous, if attachments could be kept on a leash and if senders could control privileges such as viewing, printing, saving, copying or forwarding contents.

E-mail would become more useful, and less dangerous, if attachments could be kept on a leash and if senders could control privileges such as viewing, printing, saving, copying or forwarding contents.

AirZip Document Secure, introduced last month at Comdex in Las Vegas by AirZip (www.airzip.com), "offers remote control of access to information," as Marketing Director Doug Keiller described it when I met with him for the products first demonstration.

"Were wrapping the document in an encrypted envelope of persistent access control, which follows the document wherever it goes," Keiller said.

Any attempt to access protected content triggers a query to AirZips rights server, which either grants or denies permission. I tried several ways to get around the protections, but my efforts were blocked.

AirZip provides an audit trail that records all access attempts, showing what action was taken—or attempted—by which recipients. If the mail client doesnt have the AirZip plug-in installed, the document is unreadable unless the recipient can crack 256-bit AES encryption. I dont envision any need that exceeds that level of protection.

I can imagine IT buyers desiring more heterogeneous support than AirZip offers: Windows 2000 on the server, Windows 98 or later on the client, and .Net Framework all around, plus Outlook 2000 or Lotus Notes R5 or later, are the initial entry points.

 
 
 
 
Peter Coffee is Director of Platform Research at salesforce.com, where he serves as a liaison with the developer community to define the opportunity and clarify developers' technical requirements on the company's evolving Apex Platform. Peter previously spent 18 years with eWEEK (formerly PC Week), the national news magazine of enterprise technology practice, where he reviewed software development tools and methods and wrote regular columns on emerging technologies and professional community issues.Before he began writing full-time in 1989, Peter spent eleven years in technical and management positions at Exxon and The Aerospace Corporation, including management of the latter company's first desktop computing planning team and applied research in applications of artificial intelligence techniques. He holds an engineering degree from MIT and an MBA from Pepperdine University, he has held teaching appointments in computer science, business analytics and information systems management at Pepperdine, UCLA, and Chapman College.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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