Dell's Acquisition Binge Now Includes Make Technologies

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2012-04-05 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Make Technologies' TLM Enterprise Suite provides application modernization software and services that the company claims reduces the cost, risk and time required to re-engineer applications.

Collecting new companies is now officially a habit for Dell. The Round Rock, Texas-based corporation on April 5 revealed it has bought yet another one, 13-year-old Make Technologies€”Dell's 16th acquisition in two years and third this week alone.

Terms of the deal were not released by Dell. Dell also announced the addition of Wyse Technologies and Clerity Solutions in the last four days.

Make Technologies' TLM Enterprise Suite provides application modernization software and services that the company claims reduces the cost, risk and time required to re-engineer applications.

Dell, as it expands its non-PC businesses, is rapidly upgrading and adding to its portfolio of data center software for both application optimization and cloud management. The company believes that with the macroeconomy in an improved state, more enterprises now have the capital to modernize their application banks so they can reduce legacy infrastructure operating and maintenance costs.

Most modern enterprise applications run most effectively on open, standardized platforms, including the cloud. With the acquisition of Make Technologies and combining it with Clerity Solutions and its existing Dell Services division, Dell says it now can provide upgraded end-to-end solutions from hardware through application migration services.

Make Technologies claims that its approach to the automation of application and code migration has helped IT departments reduce both volume of code and associated operational costs. Its TLM Enterprise Suite includes the following features:

  • end-to-end application portfolio transformation solutions that modernize entire portfolios of legacy applications;
  • automated application and code-migration tools to re-architect legacy application software and data to a more modern architecture:
  • a reduction in the amount of custom code in legacy portfolios, while protecting the legacy information and business processes of the business functions it supports.
Make Technologies was founded in 1999 and is headquartered in Vancouver, B.C. Dell said it would retain about 100 employees for the Dell Services team.


 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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