Dealing with Content

 
 
By Dennis Callaghan  |  Posted 2004-04-09 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Girouard said enterprise search products have tended to be too difficult to implement and maintain. "Because the search results are so poor, a ton of effort is poured into prepping the content for search," Girouard said. "Our approach is that the software ought to be able to deal with the content as it exists. Our appliance approach means you plug it in, set a few configurations, and youre off and running.
"Many companies have a dozen or more IT staffers who deal just with search. Our belief is that a lot of that time is wasted and would be unnecessary if only the software was better. Our system typically requires a small fraction of one persons time to maintain."
Girouard said Google expects to release a new version of the search appliance later this year, though he gave no further specifics on the time. He said much of the release would focus on improved "speeds and feeds" and that the company is constantly looking for ways to improve the end-user experience for both Web and enterprise search. "Were trying to be smart about getting from here to there," he said. "Most likely, what you see on Google.com, well rationalize for the enterprise. Well deliver capabilities to the enterprise that make sense for the enterprise. "Finding what youre looking for is still a hard problem in the consumer world or the enterprise. Were still mainly focused on solving that problem." Though Google has grown through acquisition, buying such companies as Deja.com; Kaltix, a personalized search tool developer; and Pyra Labs, the developer of the Blogger Web publishing tool, Girouard said the company would likely not acquire new technology for its enterprise business. "There are so many great technologies at Google right now, I think well look at them and see what we can deliver to the enterprise before we look outside the company," he said. Googles enterprise customers use the technology to search documents ranging from 20,000 pages to 10 million, Girouard said. Pricing, which is based on number of documents searched, starts at $30,000, including two years of support. Check out eWEEK.coms Enterprise Applications Center at http://enterpriseapps.eweek.com for the latest news, reviews, analysis and opinion about productivity and business solutions. Be sure to add our eWEEK.com enterprise applications news feed to your RSS newsreader or My Yahoo page:  


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel