Enterprise Networking: 2012 Summer Olympics: 7 Network Management Tips for the All-Streaming Games

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2012-07-27 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NBC will stream all of the 2012 Summer Olympics' 302 events live, showing more than 2,500 hours through 24 alternative high-definition streams. Not only will employees be able to watch through official channels, they will also have the ability to view publicly generated content on YouTube or take advantage of a new service within Facebook that will allow people to watch, share and comment on live video. NBC has also released two apps—Live Extra and NBC Olympics—for fans to watch on the go. Averaging anywhere from 200K bps to 2M bps per video stream, Olympic video streams could consume from 30 to 60 percent of a business' bandwidth, Blue Coat Systems estimates. This is up from an average of 14 percent under normal load, according to a recent application usage and risk study by Palo Alto Networks. As a proof point, look at the 2010 FIFA World Cup. During the World Cup, Web browsing and YouTube traffic drove a bandwidth increase of more than 30 percent during match time and on post-match mornings. Companies are also faced with the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) aspect of streaming. With a recent survey from mobile marketing firm Velti reporting that 40 percent of fans who plan to follow the Olympics will watch on at least two or more devices, now is the time for IT managers and administrators to prepare for an uptick in network use. eWEEK worked with Solarwinds, a provider of IT and network management software, to come up with the following tips for preparing and managing networks for the summer games this year.
 
 
 

The Impact of Streaming Video

NBC will stream all of the Olympics' 302 events live, showing more than 2,500 hours through 24 alternative HD streams. Averaging anywhere from 200K bps to 2M bps per video stream, Olympic video streams could consume from 30 to 60 percent of a business' bandwidth, according to Blue Coat Systems estimates.
The Impact of Streaming Video
 
 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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