E.piphany Improves Results, Shuffles Management

 
 
By Dennis Callaghan  |  Posted 2003-07-24 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The CRM software maker reported increased revenues and decreased losses.

E.piphany Inc. announced a leadership change Monday, promoting Karen Richardson, formerly executive vice president of worldwide operations to CEO, and Phil Fernandez, executive vice president of products and marketing to president and COO, replacing former President and CEO Roger Siboni, who will remain chairman of the board of directors of the San Mateo, Calif.-based CRM software company. E.piphany also announced second-quarter earnings Thursday, reporting increased revenues and decreased losses. Siboni in a statement described the management shakeup as part of the "natural evolution" of the company. He said Richardson, Fernandez and CFO Kevin Yeaman have been largely running the company for the past year while he has traveled with sales teams to drum up business.
"Todays announcement will ensure that we continue to derive the maximum value from the talents of our management team well into the future," Siboni said. "We are fortunate to have maintained tremendous continuity within this management team, with the same four people running the company today who helped build E.piphany into a public company."
In the quarter, E.piphany saw revenues increase to $22.2 million, up from $19.4 million in the same period a year ago. License revenues climbed from $6.8 million to $9.5 million over the same timeframe. That helped the company shave its net loss from $26.3 million to $9.4 million. In earnings news for other CRM and related software companies this week: Amdocs Ltd.s revenues fell from $380.1 million to $377.2 million year-to-year. License revenues for the St. Louis-based developer of the ClarifyCRM package were particularly hard hit, dropping from $36.8 million to $11.5 million. Amdocs did increase its net income though from $44.7 million to $50.8 million. The company also acknowledged that its under an SEC probe for its revenue projections for the second half of its 2002 fiscal year. BroadVision Inc.s total revenues were also down, from $29.4 million to $21.8 million year-over-year as license revenue dropped from $10.3 million to $6.8 million. The Redwood City, Calif.-based company cut its net loss though from $56.7 million in last years second quarter to $7.6 million this year. Art Technology Group Inc. swung to profitability, posting a $6.1 million profit after losing $2.8 million in the same period last year. A net benefit of restructuring charges thanks to the settlement of excess real estate obligations helped the Cambridge, Mass.-based company turn the corner as its revenues actually fell year-to-year, from $25.2 million to $21.3 million. License revenue dropped from $12.2 million to $9.5 million. Pivotal Corp.s revenues dropped from $19.1 million to $14.5 million as license revenue fell from $8.8 million to $5.1 million. The Vancouver, B.C.-based company did manage to cut its losses though, from $7 million to $2.9 million. Kana Software Inc. reported revenues of $12.1 million for its second quarter, down from $17.2 million in the same period a year ago. License revenue dropped from $8.3 million to $3.2 million year-to-year. Kana, of Menlo Park, Calif., did cut his net loss however, from $82.6 million in last years second quarter to $9.9 million this year. Revenues were up slightly year-over-year at direct marketing services company Digital Impact Inc., from $10.5 million to $10.9 million. That helped the San Mateo-based company cut its loss from $1.2 million to $293,000. Revenues for Blue Martini Software Inc. fell from $8.5 million to $7.9 million year-to-year, though license revenue climbed from $1.6 million to $2.5 million. The San Francisco-based company lost $4.7 million on that revenue after a $13.1 million loss in the same period last year. LivePerson Inc. increased its revenues from $1.9 million to $2.8 million year-to-year. That helped the New York-based company turn a $4,000 profit after a $51,000 loss in the same period last year. Revenues at NetPerceptions Inc. fell from $1.6 million to $913,000 year-to-year. License revenues were hardest hit, falling from $902,000 to $343,000. The Minneapolis-based company did shave its losses however, from $4.3 million to $216,000.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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