Five Technology Trends That Could Transform the Federal Government

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2009-12-07 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Input, a market research company focusing on the government sector, identifies five technology trends that it expects to transform the federal government: cloud computing, virtualization, service-oriented architecture or SOA, open-source software and geospatial technologies.

Input, a market research company focusing on the government sector, has identified five technology trends that it says will transform the federal government: cloud computing, virtualization, service-oriented architecture, open-source software and geospatial technologies.

According to a Dec. 7 news release based on Input's November report, "Emerging Technology Markets in the U.S. Federal Government, 2009-2014," these technological areas are "poised for increased federal government adoption over the next five years as cost-saving initiatives drive investment in these solutions."

Based on the study, Input officials said the company "projects the federal cloud computing market to grow from $370 million in 2009 to $1.2 billion in 2014 at a 27 percent compound annual growth rate (CAGR). The virtualization market is poised to increase from $800 million to $1.4 billion over the next five years (12 percent CAGR." Federal government spending on open-source software is expected to grow from $290 million to $430 million, a rate of 8 percent, while the federal SOA market will grow from $330 million to $660 million, at a rate of 17 percent, and the federal market for geospatial technology is expected to increase from $860 million to $1.4 billion, at a rate of 8 percent.

The company also said, "Nearly half of federal and IT industry professionals surveyed by Input believe these technologies will have a major impact on their technology environment despite concerns over security and up-front costs. ...  Obama administration initiatives, along with efforts to save costs and energy, will [spur] government decision-makers to increase adoption of emerging technology projects .... This report [also] examines the market outlook for specific emerging technologies and provides recommendations for businesses seeking opportunities in the federal market."


 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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