Power Sapped? Think Again

 
 
By John Taschek  |  Posted 2002-08-26 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A recent Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory study on electrical consumption as it relates to corporate technology generated some interesting results and piqued eWeek Labs' interest enough to revisit the LCD energy consumption issue.

A recent Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory study on electrical consumption as it relates to corporate technology generated some interesting results and piqued eWeek Labs interest enough to revisit the LCD energy consumption issue. Berkeley Labs Environmental Energy Technologies Division proved that networking and computer gear consumed only 3 percent of the nations power.

This contrasted with the much higher, more publicized estimates that led to stories in the media that blamed computer networks for events such as last years California energy crisis. The Lawrence Berkeley organization, the United States oldest national laboratory, has also conducted studies on the impact of data centers on power consumption—and has concluded that data centers consume less power than many experts had previously thought.

More information is available at www.lbl.gov.

 
 
 
 
As the director of eWEEK Labs, John manages a staff that tests and analyzes a wide range of corporate technology products. He has been instrumental in expanding eWEEK Labs' analyses into actual user environments, and has continually engineered the Labs for accurate portrayal of true enterprise infrastructures. John also writes eWEEK's 'Wide Angle' column, which challenges readers interested in enterprise products and strategies to reconsider old assumptions and think about existing IT problems in new ways. Prior to his tenure at eWEEK, which started in 1994, Taschek headed up the performance testing lab at PC/Computing magazine (now called Smart Business). Taschek got his start in IT in Washington D.C., holding various technical positions at the National Alliance of Business and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. There, he and his colleagues assisted the government office with integrating the Windows desktop operating system with HUD's legacy mainframe and mid-range servers.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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