Virtualization, Deduplication Helping the Green Cause

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2008-12-16 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Using virtualization to consolidate more workloads onto fewer machines, deduplication to process cleaner data and tiered storage to make best use of stored data has begun to pay the company back for its multibillion-dollar set of upgrades it is now undertaking.

Moving into 2009, the company has joined forces with the Green Grid, which has published some suggested power-saving metrics for next-generation data centers.

The Green Grid is a global consortium dedicated to advancing energy efficiency in data centers and business computing ecosystems.  The nonprofit group is focused on defining meaningful, user-centric models and metrics; developing standards, measurement methods, processes and new technologies to improve data center performance against the defined metrics; and promoting the adoption of energy-efficient standards, processes, measurements and technologies.

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Verizon, along with its biggest competitor, AT&T, has become a card-carrying member of the Green Grid and is putting its metrics to work in its data center networks.

Verizon generally has been the more aggressive of the two largest U.S. telcos when it comes to environmentally friendly strategies and technologies.

Here are some of the key data points in the Green Grid's recent whitepaper (PDF), "Green Grid Metrics: Data Center Infrastructure Efficiency (DCiE) Detailed Analysis."

  • Complete knowledge and understanding of each component in the data center and its power requirements.
  • Knowledge and charting of total facility power; data center input power; power for building lighting, security and cooling.
  • Knowledge and charting of minimum measurement at interval power: Level 1 (week/month), Level 2 (daily) and Level 3 (continuous). 
  • Knowledge and use of the DCiE formula, which is as follows: IT equipment power divided by total facility power; this figure comprises the actual DCiE.

In order for DCiE to become a global metric, two important requirements that all must follow are:

  • The data center manager must correctly classify each subcomponent that comprises the metric's two core contributors; and
  • The data center manager must obtain the data inputs that create DCiE's two core contributors in the same method; i.e., utilize a consistent method for data capture; actual measurements must always be used.

Verizon and AT&T both have begun implementing these data points.



 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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