Complex Mix

 
 
By Tony Sceales  |  Posted 2008-02-06 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 

In fact, enterprise application-level migration is a complex mix of business, organizational, process and technical challenges. And not only does it need to be aligned to business requirements, but it needs to stay aligned to these requirements as they inevitably change over time. The migration technology, method and the people doing the migration all have to be able to work in this new way.

So how do you deliver a successful business-driven migration? Well, there are three key strategies that you need to employ:

  • Reduce risk-High levels of risk are one factor that has led to enterprises shying away from complex migrations. Risk can be controlled and minimised by keeping data available throughout the migration and giving full visibility of the progress of the migration itself.
  • Stay agile-It is no longer acceptable for the business to be told that change is not allowed until the full data migration process has finished. It is critical that the migration of application data is kept separate from the migration of business processes, and to give the business the flexibility to decide when new processes will be used to deliver services to customers.
  • Demand faster time-to-benefits-Time is the enemy in data migration, as extended time scales increase the risk profile and the time-to-benefits. The business needs a much faster time-to-benefits and this can be achieved by finishing the migration faster and by providing the flexibility that enables the new systems to be used before all the data has migrated.
A business-driven migration uses formalized, standardized methodologies and flexible tools that can handle any type of migration style and allow you to define and migrate business data sets as distinct from database tables, rows and so on. It enables the business to take control of the migration, defining its priorities according to business and customer need rather than technical constraints, and thereby delivers a better business outcome.

Business Benefits of Better Migration

  • Increased revenues due to the ability to launch and support new services more quickly, efficiently and at lower cost.
  • Reduced costs resulting from overall lower cost of migrating data and the ability to remove duplicated or expensive-to-maintain legacy solutions and data.
  • Better business planning, since the business can plan new product launches based on the knowledge that it will not be held up by data migrations. This is important because project delays mean that lost revenues may never be recouped.
  • Increased shareholder value, as an enterprise that can reliably deliver migration projects is demonstrating both good corporate governance and the ability to respond to change.
A science graduate of the University of Wales, Tony Sceales has spent over 20 years building and managing major products and development programmes in the global software industry. During much of that time Sceales has been working in telecoms markets with the balance in the reinsurance, banking and systems software sectors. Sceales co-founded SESI as a solutions and systems integration business in 1997, successfully transforming it to form Celona Technologies in 2004. He was CEO of Celona, leading the strategic thinking behind the growth of the company until 2007 and now holds the post of CTO in which he is responsible for the direction and production of all technology. He is a regular speaker at industry events and has published articles and papers in many journals and the press. Sceales is based in London. Prior to Celona Technologies, he worked in senior architectural and management roles with British Telecom plc, IBM (Australia), Prudential Reinsurance (USA) and AON.

??Practical Data Migration is published by the British Computer Society (ISBN 978-1-902505-71-8)



 
 
 
 
A science graduate of the University of Wales, Tony Sceales has spent over 20 years building and managing major products and development programs in the global software industry. Much of that time has been working in Telecoms markets with the balance in the Reinsurance, Banking and Systems Software sectors. He co-founded SESI Ltd as a solutions and systems integration business in 1997, successfully transforming it to form Celona Technologies in 2004. He was CEO of Celona, leading the strategic thinking behind the growth of the company until 2007. He now holds the post of CTO, in which he is responsible for the direction and production of all technology. Prior to Celona Technologies, Tony worked in senior architectural and management roles with British Telecom plc, IBM (Australia), Prudential Reinsurance (USA) and AON. Based in London, Tony is a regular speaker at industry events, and has published articles and papers in many journals and the press.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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