Penguin Eases Cluster Management

 
 
By Jeffrey Burt  |  Posted 2006-11-15 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The company integrates Scyld ControlCluster into its BladeRunner blade servers and will do the same with its rack-mount systems.

Penguin Computing is bundling a new management console into its own servers as a way of making it easier for IT administrators to monitor and control their Penguin-based compute clusters. The company unveiled Scyld ControlCenter Nov. 14 at the Supercomputing 2006 show in Tampa, Fla. Penguin also announced a new scalable compute node, the Altus 600, and a suite of applications specifically designed for the life sciences space.
Scyld ControlCenter allows users to remotely monitor key data about their servers, including the server type, CPUs, memory, voltages and temperature. It also enables them to track events, such as when a blade server is inserted or removed; receive warnings if safety margins are being approached; and control their servers from a single point.
In addition, administrators can maintain control over user access to the systems, allowing them to avoid bottlenecks or security issues. "It really is going to be about flexibility in these [cluster] environments," said Pauline Nist, senior vice president of product development and management at Penguin, in San Francisco. The software tool is available immediately on Penguins BladeRunner Linux blade server and will be available on the companys 1U (1.5-inch) and 2U (3.5-inch) rack-mount systems in the first quarter of 2007, Nist said. Penguins Altus 600 is a low-cost node powered by Advanced Micro Devices Opteron 2000 series chips. The system is part of the companys line of integrated hardware and software Linux cluster systems. The Scyld Life Sciences Suite HPC is based on Penguins Scyld ClusterWare and is a preintegrated Web-based framework for managing applications from a single point of control. It works in a click-and-point manner, Nist said. "Its really an ease-of-use product for the bio life sciences space," she said. Nist said Linux clusters are continuing to grow in commercial spaces, such as oil and gas. Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest news, views and analysis on servers, switches and networking protocols for the enterprise and small businesses.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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