Linux Vendors Welcome Dells Prebundling Move

 
 
By Peter Galli  |  Posted 2007-05-01 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

While officials for Red Hat and Novell's SUSE have welcomed the move as good for the industry, they also downplayed its competitive significance.

Leading Linux distributors Red Hat and Novells SUSE have welcomed the news that Dell is going to prebundle Ubuntu Linux on certain consumer machines, saying the move is good for society, customers and the industry.

"Its great news that Dell has decided to join other OEMs in delivering Linux desktops. Demand for Linux clients is increasing across the board and were glad to see this further evidence of the inexorable expansion of open source to new users and new markets," Scott Crenshaw, the vice president of Red Hats enterprise Linux platform business, said May 1.
For Justin Steinman, Novells director of marketing for Linux and open source, the move is just one more proof point in the continued growth of Linux.
"As proponents of open source and Linux, were happy to see Linux being preloaded onto consumer desktops." But Steinman then downplayed its significance. "I wouldnt necessarily refer to the Dell-Ubuntu deal as major. Dell is only going to load Ubuntu on three machines targeted at the technical consumer market, and the only support option available will be through online technical self-help forums, which will be monitored by the community," he said. To read more about Dells decision to preload Ubuntu Linux on some consumer machines, click here.
However, Jane Silber, Canonicals director of operations in London, told eWEEK that the company will provide commercial Ubuntu support for customers who choose to buy this through the Dell Web site when available. But, for Novell, Dells announcement is nothing more than the loading of Linux onto desktops aimed at the technical enthusiast community—the same community of people who voted on Dells IdeaStorm Web site. These are not Novells target customers for the Linux desktop, Steinman said. "Our target customer is the enterprise business user, and so weve focused SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop squarely at the business market," Steinman said. "We believe the Linux desktop is ready for mainstream deployment in the enterprise, and that means you need to have enterprise quality support—something that Ubuntu does not offer." Novell, Steinman then claimed, was in "serious conversations with several leading hardware OEMs" about preloading a Linux desktop that will be targeted at broad enterprise use. "When we release SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop on a preloaded machine, it will come with the enterprise support that our customers require to run their businesses. Stay tuned for more details," he said. Red Hats Crenshaw also offered up a litany of reasons why the deal with Dell was not appropriate for Red Hat, saying that while the Raleigh, N.C., company continues to invest in delivering client solutions, "we wont be all things to all people." Read more here about how Dell is confronting its problems and focusing on a new direction. Red Hat was focusing on encouraging the growth of free and open-source software, as this created better software, communities and value, he said. While Red Hat was also approached by hardware vendors about preloading its software onto desktop or laptop computers, the company said that it pursues these deals "when the arrangement makes appropriate financial and strategic sense…Buying market share is an easy way to get headlines, but doesnt build a sustainable business model, which allows continued support or investment," Crenshaw said. Read more here about how Red Hat is planning a Linux desktop offering for the masses. He said that Red Hat decided to focus its client investment in a few key areas because the company doesnt think it is its their mission to build a Windows clone. "We think its our mission is to make computing better, more accessible and more powerful. In Red Hat parlance, we want to democratize technology," Crenshaw said. But, that being said, Crenshaw expressed the hope that the Dell-Ubuntu project is successful. "The real win for everyone is accelerated adoption of open source," he said. Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest open-source news, reviews and analysis.
 
 
 
 
Peter Galli has been a financial/technology reporter for 12 years at leading publications in South Africa, the UK and the US. He has been Investment Editor of South Africa's Business Day Newspaper, the sister publication of the Financial Times of London.

He was also Group Financial Communications Manager for First National Bank, the second largest banking group in South Africa before moving on to become Executive News Editor of Business Report, the largest daily financial newspaper in South Africa, owned by the global Independent Newspapers group.

He was responsible for a national reporting team of 20 based in four bureaus. He also edited and contributed to its weekly technology page, and launched a financial and technology radio service supplying daily news bulletins to the national broadcaster, the South African Broadcasting Corporation, which were then distributed to some 50 radio stations across the country.

He was then transferred to San Francisco as Business Report's U.S. Correspondent to cover Silicon Valley, trade and finance between the US, Europe and emerging markets like South Africa. After serving that role for more than two years, he joined eWeek as a Senior Editor, covering software platforms in August 2000.

He has comprehensively covered Microsoft and its Windows and .Net platforms, as well as the many legal challenges it has faced. He has also focused on Sun Microsystems and its Solaris operating environment, Java and Unix offerings. He covers developments in the open source community, particularly around the Linux kernel and the effects it will have on the enterprise.

He has written extensively about new products for the Linux and Unix platforms, the development of open standards and critically looked at the potential Linux has to offer an alternative operating system and platform to Windows, .Net and Unix-based solutions like Solaris.

His interviews with senior industry executives include Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, Linus Torvalds, the original developer of the Linux operating system, Sun CEO Scot McNealy, and Bill Zeitler, a senior vice president at IBM.

For numerous examples of his writing you can search under his name at the eWEEK Website at www.eweek.com.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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