New Tool Roots Out SCO Code

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2003-08-07 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

New tool from Aduva Inc. contains a feature known as SCO Check that can scan systems for code and replace it.

SAN FRANCISCO—With legal terms such as liability, indemnification and lawsuit as prominent themes of the LinuxWorld show here, a small software company has addressed the issue with a solution to find offensive code. Aduva Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif., has developed a system known as OnStage that contains a feature known as SCO Check that will "conduct a complete inventory of your system and if SCO [The SCO Group] identifies some illegal code, we can do a check to find the code, identify it and then automate the replacement of that code" with Red Hat Linux or an appropriate fix, said Chris Van Tuin, director of customer service for Aduva. The company announced OnStage 2.0 at the show and added the SCO Check features over the last few weeks, Van Tuin said.
"Weve been busy talking with a lot of enterprise customers and were seeing them continue to evaluate Linux, particularly in test environments," Van Tuin said. "Weve seen some hold back because of the SCO pressure—for instance were seeing the more conservative companies hold back because theyre looking for someone to indemnify them."
However, the Aduva technology can put such worriers at relative ease, according to Van Tuin. Van Tuin said IBM Corp., BMC Software Inc. and Intel Corp. are investors in Aduva. In addition, Aduva also announced SoundCheck, a snippet of the OnStage technology the company is delivering for free. SoundCheck scans Linux servers and identifies potential problems, such as missing dependencies, security issues and unaccepted bug fixes that could cause application failures or security leaks. It is available for download free of charge at www.aduva.com/soundcheck.
Christina Johansen, a spokeswoman for the company, said in the event of a ruling in SCOs favor, Aduva intends to release a tailored version of SoundCheck, tuned to find the specific code identified in the courts decision.
 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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