Novell to Get $348M from Microsoft

 
 
By Steven Vaughan-Nichols  |  Posted 2006-11-07 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Novell/Microsoft deal's details are coming out; the Linux company will get $348 million from Microsoft off the bat for the agreement. (Linux-Watch)

Novell on Nov. 7 published additional details about its agreements with Microsoft concerning Windows and Linux interoperability and patents. It seems the company is receiving an up-front payment of $348 million from Microsoft, for SLES (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server) subscription "certificates" and for patent cross-licensing. In Novells Form 8-K submission to the SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission), Entry into a Material Definitive Agreement, the company states that "Under the Business Collaboration Agreement, which expires January 1, 2012, Novell and Microsoft will market a combined offering.
Click here to read more about the groundbreaking Linux deal between Microsoft and Novell.
"The combined offering will consist of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) and a subscription for SLES support along with Microsoft Windows Server, Microsoft Virtual Server and Microsoft Viridian that will be offered to customers desiring to deploy Linux and Windows in a virtualized setting." Virtualization has become a hot topic in IT circles over the last few years. IDC predicts that the total market for virtual machine software will be $1.8 billion by 2009.
For this package, Microsoft will make an up-front payment to Novell of $240 million for SLES subscription "certificates" that Microsoft can use, resell or distribute over the term of the agreement. These certificates, in turn, can be used to redeem single or multi-year subscriptions for SLES support from Novell. John Pallatto contributed additional reporting to this story. Read the full story on Linux-Watch: Novell Gets $348 Million from Microsoft Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest open-source news, reviews and analysis.
 
 
 
 
Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols is editor at large for Ziff Davis Enterprise. Prior to becoming a technology journalist, Vaughan-Nichols worked at NASA and the Department of Defense on numerous major technological projects. Since then, he's focused on covering the technology and business issues that make a real difference to the people in the industry.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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