OpenLogic Ranks Top Open-Source Projects of 2011

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2012-01-09 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

OpenLogic delivers its annual list of the fastest growing open-source projects of 2011, leading with HBase and Node.js.

OpenLogic, a provider of enterprise open-source solutions for the cloud and the data center, recently announced its 2011 trending report for open-source software.

The report ranks hot open-source projects in three key categories: Web and application servers; application frameworks; and databases and big data.

To develop its report, OpenLogic analyzed popular as well as up-and-coming open-source projects that are used as core infrastructure in enterprise applications. The analysis was to evaluate whether enterprise adoption of the projects was trending up, staying level or trending down. 

For each open-source project, OpenLogic analyzed eight metrics that include public data, as well as aggregated data from OpenLogic's tools and customer base of more than 250 enterprises throughout the world.

According to the report, the five projects that were fastest growing or gained the most were, in ranking order: HBase, a distributed, column-oriented database system built on top of Hadoop; Node.js, a platform for writing highly scalable Internet applications in JavaScript; nginx, a high concurrency, low memory usage web server and reverse proxy; Hadoop, a framework for distributed processing of large data sets across clusters of computers; and Ruby on Rails, a highly scalable Web application framework.

"OpenLogic has a 360 degree view of how open source is being deployed in the enterprise and in the cloud," said Kim Weins, senior vice president of marketing at OpenLogic, in a statement. "The projects that allow organizations to efficiently scale their operations and manage big data are by far outpacing the growth of other open-source projects. We expect to see many of these up-and-coming projects continue to challenge the traditional open-source leaders over the coming year."

Overall, according to OpenLogic, the top 16 hottest open-source projects based on growth from 2010 to 2011 were:

1. HBase

2. Node.js

3. nginx

4. Hadoop

5. Ruby on Rails

6. MongoDB

7. Tomcat

8. MySQL

9. Apache HTTP Server

10. Spring Framework

11. PostgreSQL (tie

11. Grails (tie)

12. Struts

13. JBoss

14. GlassFish

15. CouchDB

As stated, OpenLogic also evaluated each category and categorized projects as "trending up" (up across most or all metrics), "trending level" (up and down on a roughly equal number of metrics), or "trending down" (down across all or most metrics).

For the Application Server/Web Server category: Node.js and nginx were trending up; Tomcat and Apache HTTP Server were trending level; and JBoss and GlassFish were trending down.

For the Frameworks category: Ruby on Rails was trending up; Spring Grails and Struts were trending level, with no projects trending down.

For the database and big data category: HBase, Hadoop and MongoDB were trending up; MySQL and PostgreSQL were trending level; and CouchDB was trending down.

The OpenLogic report ranked year over year--January 2010 through November 2010 and January 2011 through November 2011--data based on growth or loss on several metrics. The data comes from several sources including public data from Google searches. The report also evaluated OpenLogic OLEX search volume, views of packages, downloads, requests within corporations to use the project and matches against the project during scans. OpenLogic OLEX is a software-as-a-service solution for the governance and provisioning of open-source software used by many Fortune 100 companies. OpenLogic also aggregated data on customers purchasing support contracts from OpenLogic for each project, as well as projects that users deployed through OpenLogic CloudSwing, an open platform-as-a-service offering.

 


 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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