Red Hat to Build a Virtual Appliance OS

 
 
By Peter Galli  |  Posted 2007-05-09 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The open-source solutions provider has partnered with Intel Corp. to deploy appliances in a virtual machine to bring enterprise-class management and security to the PC.

SAN DIEGO, Calif.—Open-source solution provider Red Hat will use its annual summit to share its vision of a new paradigm for business PCs, which includes a partnership with Intel Corp. to deploy appliances in a virtual machine to bring enterprise-class management and security to the PC. As part of the deal, Red Hat will deliver a branded software platform that supports desktop PCs with Intel vPro chip technology.
The appliance operating system from Red Hat will support pluggable virtual appliances, which will be available through ISVs, to deliver end-to-end manageability, Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens said at its annual Red Hat Summit here on May 9.
Read more here about how Intel vPro promises IT managers less needy desktops. Virtual appliances can be used for network security, provisioning, monitoring and asset management, regardless of the state of the desktop operating system. Red Hat, in collaboration with Intel, also plans to develop, productize and support the necessary software components, including the hypervisor, the service operating system and software development kit.
Product development has already started, with beta software expected later this year and a general release planned for 2008. Red Hat is planning a Linux desktop offering "for the masses." Click here to read more. "PCs with Intel vPro processor technology running Red Hats virtual appliance operating system will be able to host business applications in an isolated, secure and manageable manner. End users, IT departments, OEMs and ISVs will all benefit from the solutions that will be created on the back of these core technologies," Stevens said. The collaboration will bring the power of hardware-assisted virtualization to business desktop computing, while customers should see reduced management costs, improved operational efficiency and less exposure to security threats, regardless of the client operating system, Stevens said. "The legacy desktop falls short in its ability to provide a secure, reliable and manageable environment. Intel vPro technology, combined with a Red Hat Virtual Appliance operating system, will allow customers to create a rock-solid foundation that can then provision, manage and secure the PC. This technology will reduce operational costs and increase operational flexibility. We are delighted to partner with Intel on this project," he said. To read more about Intels latest vPro platform, click here. For his part, Doug Fisher, the vice president and general manager of Intels system software division, said the project would unlock the capabilities of the advanced business PC. "The virtual appliance capability built into the operating environment of business PCs, coupled with technologies like Intels virtualization and active management, will enable a new level of solutions from the software ecosystem," he said. Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest open-source news, reviews and analysis.
 
 
 
 
Peter Galli has been a financial/technology reporter for 12 years at leading publications in South Africa, the UK and the US. He has been Investment Editor of South Africa's Business Day Newspaper, the sister publication of the Financial Times of London.

He was also Group Financial Communications Manager for First National Bank, the second largest banking group in South Africa before moving on to become Executive News Editor of Business Report, the largest daily financial newspaper in South Africa, owned by the global Independent Newspapers group.

He was responsible for a national reporting team of 20 based in four bureaus. He also edited and contributed to its weekly technology page, and launched a financial and technology radio service supplying daily news bulletins to the national broadcaster, the South African Broadcasting Corporation, which were then distributed to some 50 radio stations across the country.

He was then transferred to San Francisco as Business Report's U.S. Correspondent to cover Silicon Valley, trade and finance between the US, Europe and emerging markets like South Africa. After serving that role for more than two years, he joined eWeek as a Senior Editor, covering software platforms in August 2000.

He has comprehensively covered Microsoft and its Windows and .Net platforms, as well as the many legal challenges it has faced. He has also focused on Sun Microsystems and its Solaris operating environment, Java and Unix offerings. He covers developments in the open source community, particularly around the Linux kernel and the effects it will have on the enterprise.

He has written extensively about new products for the Linux and Unix platforms, the development of open standards and critically looked at the potential Linux has to offer an alternative operating system and platform to Windows, .Net and Unix-based solutions like Solaris.

His interviews with senior industry executives include Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, Linus Torvalds, the original developer of the Linux operating system, Sun CEO Scot McNealy, and Bill Zeitler, a senior vice president at IBM.

For numerous examples of his writing you can search under his name at the eWEEK Website at www.eweek.com.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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