Centrinity Is All Talk—Literally

 
 
By Timothy Dyck  |  Posted 2001-03-19 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

At the eWeek Excellence Awards winners banquet last month, I had the opportunity to hear about one of the most interesting companies I've come across in a while

At the eWeek Excellence Awards winners banquet last month, I had the opportunity to hear about one of the most interesting companies Ive come across in a while.

Centrinity has, over the past decade, developed an incredibly ambitious voice, e-mail, instant messaging, fax and groupware integrated communications system (called FirstClass Unified Messaging) based on the founding staffs experience building Nortel Networks Meridian Mail voice mail system.

In addition to all the message types it handles, it supports an amazing variety of clients: its native Windows, Mac OS and Unix client software; generic Post Office Protocol or Internet Message Access Protocol mail clients; Web browsers; digital cell phones; a phone-based voice interface using text-to-speech software; Palm devices; and even Telnet clients.

So far, the software has had most of its success in the academic market, where high numbers of users need to be supported with little administrative support.

"Students are the prototypical mobile knowledge worker," said Scott Welch, Centrinitys chief evangelist and former CEO, in Markham, Ontario.

The University of Maine is a customer and supports 13,000 users on a single four-way Windows NT server with 512MB of RAM. That server had processed 700,000 log-ins and 500,000 messages over the course of 10 days when I looked at its status display.

 
 
 
 
Timothy Dyck is a Senior Analyst with eWEEK Labs. He has been testing and reviewing application server, database and middleware products and technologies for eWEEK since 1996. Prior to joining eWEEK, he worked at the LAN and WAN network operations center for a large telecommunications firm, in operating systems and development tools technical marketing for a large software company and in the IT department at a government agency. He has an honors bachelors degree of mathematics in computer science from the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and a masters of arts degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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