Client Side

 
 
By Jason Brooks  |  Posted 2008-07-31 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


On the client side, the primary face of Exchange Online is a new single sign-on application that offers a common authentication, and a single launching point, for the various Microsoft Online Services to which a user has access. What's more, the application will handle initial setup of a local instance of Outlook 2007 if there's one present on your client system.

The application's Outlook setup function worked well enough, but when I fired up Internet Explorer 7 to access OWA, I was prompted for my password, even though I'd already logged on through the single sign-on tool. I'm hoping that Microsoft gets its promised single sign-on support working before it marks this service as RTM.

Finally, I synced one of my Exchange Online accounts up with an iPod Touch running Apple's new 2.0 firmware. Here, the trick was locating the correct URL to use to configure the service from my device. I eventually found the string I needed (red001.mail.microsoftonline.com) on Microsoft's TechNet Web site, but I would have preferred it if the ActiveSync-Exchange combo could have managed to automatically discover the configuration details from my e-mail domain.

eWEEK Labs' Executive Editor Jason Brooks can be reached at jbrooks@eweek.com.



 
 
 
 
As Editor in Chief of eWEEK Labs, Jason Brooks manages the Labs team and is responsible for eWEEK's print edition. Brooks joined eWEEK in 1999, and has covered wireless networking, office productivity suites, mobile devices, Windows, virtualization, and desktops and notebooks. JasonÔÇÖs coverage is currently focused on Linux and Unix operating systems, open-source software and licensing, cloud computing and Software as a Service. Follow Jason on Twitter at jasonbrooks, or reach him by email at jbrooks@eweek.com.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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